INFOSCUM
 
Science     Deals     Videos     Podcasts

Today Only
Yesterday Only
Sun, Feb 16, 2020
Sat, Feb 15, 2020
Fri, Feb 14, 2020
Thu, Feb 13, 2020
Wed, Feb 12, 2020
Tue, Feb 11, 2020
Mon, Feb 10, 2020
Sun, Feb 9, 2020
Sat, Feb 8, 2020
Fri, Feb 7, 2020
Thu, Feb 6, 2020
Wed, Feb 5, 2020
Tue, Feb 4, 2020
Mon, Feb 3, 2020
Sun, Feb 2, 2020
Sat, Feb 1, 2020
Fri, Jan 31, 2020
Thu, Jan 30, 2020
Wed, Jan 29, 2020
Tue, Jan 28, 2020
Mon, Jan 27, 2020
Sun, Jan 26, 2020
Sat, Jan 25, 2020
Fri, Jan 24, 2020
Thu, Jan 23, 2020
Wed, Jan 22, 2020
Tue, Jan 21, 2020
Mon, Jan 20, 2020
Sun, Jan 19, 2020
Sat, Jan 18, 2020
Fri, Jan 17, 2020
Thu, Jan 16, 2020
Wed, Jan 15, 2020
Tue, Jan 14, 2020
Mon, Jan 13, 2020
Sun, Jan 12, 2020
Sat, Jan 11, 2020
Fri, Jan 10, 2020
Thu, Jan 9, 2020
Wed, Jan 8, 2020
Tue, Jan 7, 2020
Mon, Jan 6, 2020
Sun, Jan 5, 2020
Sat, Jan 4, 2020
Fri, Jan 3, 2020
Thu, Jan 2, 2020
Wed, Jan 1, 2020
Tue, Dec 31, 2019
Mon, Dec 30, 2019
Sun, Dec 29, 2019
Sat, Dec 28, 2019
Fri, Dec 27, 2019
Thu, Dec 26, 2019
Wed, Dec 25, 2019
Tue, Dec 24, 2019
Mon, Dec 23, 2019
Sun, Dec 22, 2019
Sat, Dec 21, 2019
Fri, Dec 20, 2019
Thu, Dec 19, 2019
Wed, Dec 18, 2019
Tue, Dec 17, 2019
Mon, Dec 16, 2019
Sun, Dec 15, 2019
Sat, Dec 14, 2019
Fri, Dec 13, 2019
Thu, Dec 12, 2019
Wed, Dec 11, 2019
Tue, Dec 10, 2019
Mon, Dec 9, 2019
Sun, Dec 8, 2019
Sat, Dec 7, 2019
Fri, Dec 6, 2019
Thu, Dec 5, 2019
Wed, Dec 4, 2019
Tue, Dec 3, 2019
Mon, Dec 2, 2019
Sun, Dec 1, 2019
Sat, Nov 30, 2019
Fri, Nov 29, 2019
Thu, Nov 28, 2019
Wed, Nov 27, 2019
Tue, Nov 26, 2019
Mon, Nov 25, 2019
Sun, Nov 24, 2019
Sat, Nov 23, 2019
Fri, Nov 22, 2019
Thu, Nov 21, 2019
Wed, Nov 20, 2019
Tue, Nov 19, 2019

Bezos launches $10 bn fund to combat climate change
His company is often criticized for its environmental record, but Jeff Bezos, CEO of Amazon and the world's richest man, said Monday that he was committing $10 billion to a new fund to tackle climate change.
1h ago phys.org
Bushfire crisis hit 75% of Australians: survey
Three in four Australians—almost 18 million people—were affected by the country's deadly bushfire crisis, according to a survey released Tuesday that also pointed to plummeting support for the government and for coal projects.
1h ago phys.org
Smog veils Central Asia cities as smoky stoves choke locals
Snow-capped peaks used to be clearly visible from the streets of Almaty and Bishkek, two of the largest cities in Central Asia that both lie in plains surrounded by mountains.
1h ago phys.org
Drought slashes Australian crop output to record low
Australia's hottest and driest year on record has slashed crop production, with summer output expected to fall to the lowest levels on record, according to official projections released Tuesday.
1h ago phys.org
Amazon forest disturbance is changing how plants are dispersed
The study looked at areas in the Brazilian Amazon with varying levels of disturbance from activities like logging or burning. The researchers found that not only did human disturbance reduce overall tree diversity, it increased the proportion of trees with seeds dispersed by animals as opposed to other mechanisms like wind.
1h ago phys.org
Hurricane Harvey tops league of most extreme US weather this decade
A top ten of record-breaking US weather events of the last decade reveals Hurricane Harvey is the most extreme of the decade, and similar others were among the costliest and deadliest on record, according to magazine Weatherwise.
1h ago phys.org
Here’s where Jeff Bezos could start spending that $10 billion tackling climate change
12h ago technologyreview.com
Vaccine misinformation and social media
People who rely on social media for information were more likely to be misinformed about vaccines than those who rely on traditional media, according to a new study. The study, based on surveys of nearly 2,500 US adults, found that up to 20% of respondents were at least somewhat misinformed about vaccines.
12h ago sciencedaily.com
New guidelines on aspirin in primary prevention
New guidelines recommend aspirin use in primary prevention for people ages 40 to 70 years old who are at higher risk of a first cardiovascular event, but not for those over 70. Yet, people over 70 are at higher risks of cardiovascular events than those under 70. As a result, health care providers are understandably confused about whether or not to prescribe aspirin for primary prevention of heart attacks or strokes, and if so, to whom.
12h ago sciencedaily.com
Seeding oceans with iron may not impact climate change
A new study suggests that iron fertilization may not have a significant impact on phytoplankton growth, at least on a global scale.
12h ago sciencedaily.com
SpaceX re-useable rocket misses landing ship
SpaceX successfully launched its latest cluster of high-speed internet satellites into orbit Monday but was unable to land its rocket booster on an autonomous ship, missing a key milestone.
13h ago phys.org
The messy, secretive reality behind OpenAI’s bid to save the world
The AI moonshot was founded in the spirit of transparency. This is the inside story of how competitive pressure eroded that idealism.
13h ago technologyreview.com
Reconstructing the diets of fossil vertebrates
Paleodietary studies of the fossil record are impeded by a lack of reliable and unequivocal tracers. Scientists from the MPI for Evolutionary Anthropology, the MPI for Chemistry and the Johannes Gutenberg University (JGU) in Mainz have now tested a new method, the isotope analysis of zinc isotopes from the tooth enamel of fossil mammals, and found it to be well suited to expand our knowledge about the diets of fossil humans and other Pleistocene mammals.
14h ago phys.org
Seeding oceans with iron may not impact climate change
Historically, the oceans have done much of the planet's heavy lifting when it comes to sequestering carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Microscopic organisms known collectively as phytoplankton, which grow throughout the sunlit surface oceans and absorb carbon dioxide through photosynthesis, are a key player.
14h ago phys.org
Atomic structures mapped in measles, mumps, flu and RSV
Northwestern University researchers have, for the first time, determined the 3-D atomic structure of a key complex in paramyxoviruses, a family of viruses that includes measles, mumps, human parainfluenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).
14h ago phys.org
Mediterranean rainfall immediately affected by greenhouse gas changes
Mediterranean-type climates face immediate drops in rainfall when greenhouse gases rise, but this could be interrupted quickly if emissions are cut.
14h ago phys.org
Extreme weather to overload urban power grids, study shows
Extreme hot spells made increasingly likely by climate change could overload urban power grids and cause roving blackouts as an ever-greater share of humanity opt to live in cities, scientists said Monday.
17h ago phys.org
Algorithms might be better than us at predicting whether people will reoffend
17h ago technologyreview.com
Breakthrough Listen releases 2 petabytes of data from SETI survey of Milky Way
Breakthrough Listen announced its second major release of SETI data: a radio survey of the plane of the Milky Way and the galactic center. The public is urged to search the data for signals from intelligent civilizations. A former undergraduate initiated the analysis by looking at emissions from 20 nearby stars that could see Earth transiting our sun. The VLA also signed on to capture radio data for SETI.
17h ago sciencedaily.com
Freshwater insects recover while spiders decline in UK
Many insects, mosses and lichens in the UK are bucking the trend of biodiversity loss, according to a comprehensive analysis of over 5,000 species.
17h ago sciencedaily.com
New green technology generates electricity 'out of thin air'
Electrical engineers and microbiologists have created a device they call an 'Air-gen.' or air-powered generator, with electrically conductive protein nanowires produced by the microbe Geobacter. The Air-gen connects electrodes to the protein nanowires in such a way that electrical current is generated from the water vapor naturally present in the atmosphere.
17h ago sciencedaily.com
Freshwater insects recover while spiders decline in UK
Many insects, mosses and lichens in the UK are bucking the trend of biodiversity loss, according to a comprehensive analysis of over 5,000 species led by UCL and the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (UKCEH).
18h ago phys.org
New green technology generates electricity 'out of thin air'
Scientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst have developed a device that uses a natural protein to create electricity from moisture in the air, a new technology they say could have significant implications for the future of renewable energy, climate change and in the future of medicine.
18h ago phys.org
Reproductive genome from the laboratory
The field of synthetic biology does not only observe and describe processes of life but also mimics them. A key characteristic of life is the ability for replication, which means the maintenance of a chemical system. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried generated a system, which is able to regenerate parts of its own DNA and protein building blocks.
18h ago phys.org
Scientists call for reform on rankings and indices of science journals
Researchers are used to being evaluated based on indices like the impact factors of the scientific journals in which they publish papers and their number of citations. A team of 14 natural scientists from nine countries are now rebelling against this practice, arguing that obsessive use of indices is damaging the quality of science.
18h ago phys.org
Protein function maintains the balance between protrusive and contractile cell machineries
Tropomodulin maintains the fine balance between the protein machineries responsible for cell movement and morphogenesis. Disturbances in this balance are common in many diseases, for example, invasive cancers.
18h ago phys.org
More efficient photocatalysts could unlock the potential of solar energy
An organic semiconductor photocatalyst that significantly enhances the generation of hydrogen gas could lead to more efficient energy storage technologies.
18h ago phys.org
Research reveals how ski tourism operators can protect profits in the face of climate change
Research by Cass Business School academics has presented a methodology for identifying how winter tourism operators can protect themselves against the risk of decreasing visitor numbers to ski destinations and lost revenues.
18h ago phys.org
Africa's growing lead battery industry is causing extensive contamination
Africa is facing a serious lead poisoning problem. In Senegal, for example, researchers linked the deaths of children from processing lead waste to supply a lead battery recycling plant in a poor suburb of Dakar. Villagers supply lead waste to the plant for compensation.
18h ago phys.org
Lensless on-chip microscopy platform shows slides in full view
When you look through a microscope, whatever is on the stage is magnified to a degree the naked eye can hardly imagine. While traditional microscopy techniques allow miniscule details to come into view, standard equipment doesn't provide us with the full picture.
18h ago phys.org
Rain has eased the dry, but more is needed to break the drought
After the intensely dry conditions of 2019, January and February have brought much-needed rain. Dams in many cities and towns were replenished and some farmers may be able to grow a crop for the first time in several seasons. So does this mean the drought has broken?
19h ago phys.org
New material to surpass traditional oxygen reduction reaction catalysts
A research group led by Prof. YANG Minghui at the Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering (NIMTE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) discovered that zirconium nitride (ZrN) catalysts could be a superior alternative to expensive platinum (Pt) catalysts for oxygen reduction. The study was published in Nature Materials.
19h ago phys.org
Perovskites reveal huge resettable single-photon response
Despite the progress in perovskite device efficiencies, these systems are not fully understood, in particular the frequency- and power-dependence of their response to light. Yu-Hwa Lo and colleagues at the University of California in San Diego (UCSD) now report on systematic investigations of how these devices respond to light for frequencies varying over eight orders of magnitude and power ranging from millions to single photons.
19h ago phys.org
A Bold Proposal for Easing the Venezuela-Colombia Migrant Crisis
Building solar and wind power along the border would provide jobs, clean water and more productive farms -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
19h ago blogs.scientificamerican.com
Edaphic factors are important to explain and predict impact of climate change on species distribution
The climate change crisis has resulted in an emphasis on the role of broad-scale climate in controlling species distributions. A key metric for predicting the impacts of climate change on species and ecosystems is the local velocity of climate change: how fast a species must move across the landscape to track its preferred climate in space. However, other ecologically important environmental variables will move much more slowly (e.g., some soil properties) or not at all (e.g., underlying geology).
19h ago phys.org
Ancient plant foods discovered in Arnhem Land
Australia's first plant foods—eaten by early populations 65,000 years ago—have been discovered in Arnhem Land.
19h ago phys.org
Trial finds benefits to people and wildlife from beavers living wild in English countryside
A major five-year study into the impacts of beavers on the English countryside has concluded that the water-living mammals can bring measurable benefits to people and wildlife.
19h ago phys.org
Image: Hubble embraces spiral with open arms
The spiral galaxy NGC 2008 sits center stage, its ghostly spiral arms spreading out toward us, in this image captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.
19h ago phys.org
Three quarters of Aussies impacted by summer bushfires
More than three quarters of Australian adults report that they were affected by the nation's recent unprecedented bushfires, according to a new poll from The Australian National University (ANU).
19h ago phys.org
Environment high on list of worries for half of Aussie voter
The environment has rocketed up to either number one or two on the list of worries for about half of Australian voters, according to a new poll from The Australian National University (ANU).
19h ago phys.org
De novo genes far more common and important than scientists thought
Scientists from Trinity and the University of Pittsburgh have discovered that de novo genes—genes that have evolved from scratch—are both more common and more important than previously believed.
19h ago phys.org
Plastic pollution poses new threat to a turtle paradise
These are turbulent times for turtles.
19h ago phys.org
Increasing the service life of polymer electrolyte fuel cells with a nanodispersed ionomer
Protons (subatomic particles) can be transferred from the anode to the cathode through the ionomer membrane in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC). Scientists can extend proton pathways by impregnating the ionomer (type of polymer) into the electrodes to achieve improved proton transfer efficiency. Since the impregnated ionomer can mechanically bind catalysts within the electrode, they are known as a binder. In a new report on Science Advances, Chi-Yeong Ahn and a research team introduced a simple approach to use a supercritical fluid and prepare a homogenous nanoscale dispersion of binder material in aqueous alcohol. The preparation showed high dispersion character, crystallinity and proton conductivity for high performance and durable applications in a PEFC cathode electrode.
19h ago phys.org
Plane, train, or automobile? The climate impact of transport is complicated
The 2020s will have to involve some very big decisions about transport – the UK's most polluting sector. The UK government's response so far has been erratic, choosing to intervene to prevent the collapse of Flybe (Europe's biggest regional airline) and give the green light for the high-speed rail project, HS2.
19h ago phys.org
Value co-creation: From 'consume and dispose' to 'consume and pass on'
Major industrialized nations currently live in a "consume and dispose" world. This is great for firms' bottom lines and abstract measures such as GDP, but the social and environmental costs of this way of life have been high—for example, the high price of "fast fashion". We're all encouraged to use less and recycle more, but how can we as a society shift to a "consume and pass on" model?
19h ago phys.org
New all-sky search reveals potential neutrino sources
For over a century, scientists have been observing very high-energy charged particles called cosmic rays arriving from outside Earth's atmosphere. The origins of these particles are very difficult to pinpoint because the particles themselves do not travel on a straight path to Earth. Even gamma rays, a type of high-energy photon that offers a little more insight, are absorbed when traversing long distances.
19h ago phys.org
Having a clock in your shower could help to reduce water consumption
Findings from a small preliminary study with residents of the Cranfield University campus have shown that shower times are significantly shorter when showers are fitted with time displays.
19h ago phys.org
Systems analysis for a new Arctic
The Arctic region has long been seen as one of the Earth's most remote frontiers. However, the Arctic is changing quickly, which is important in global governance, geopolitics and the global economy. Temperatures have warmed faster than the rest of the planet; sea ice dramatically declines in summers; exploitation of oil and gas, new (sea) trade routes, tourism and other economic activities are expanding. At the same time, the region, claimed by eight states and inhabited by dozens of groups of Indigenous peoples, has the potential for geopolitical stability and constructive cooperation—a precondition for largely international and multidisciplinary Arctic research.
19h ago phys.org
Origin of life: A Darwinian machine for non-living objects
Life is usefully defined on the basis of process: Any set of entities that participates in the process of evolution by natural selection is alive. But how does evolution by natural selection—and thus life—get started? The answer is far from obvious. Lack of insight haunts origins of life research and plagues understanding of the major evolutionary transitions, including the transition from cells to multicellular life.
19h ago phys.org
Flood buyouts disproportionately benefit whitest at-risk neighborhoods in cities
The federal flood buyout program disproportionally benefits at-risk homes in the whitest communities of America's largest cities, according to a study from sociologists at Rice University.
19h ago phys.org
Scientists unlock low-cost material to shape light for industry
Researchers in Australia have found a way to manipulate laser light at a fraction of the cost of current technology.
20h ago phys.org
Bioengineers developing organisms without biological parents
Bioengineers are on the brink of developing artificial organisms that will open up new applications in medicine and industry. Beat Christen discusses their risks and benefits.
20h ago phys.org
Holstein steers given hormone implants grow as well as beef steers
Holstein steers that get hormone implants grow faster than those that do not receive the implants, and they get as big as beef cattle breeds, according to Penn State researchers, who say that's good news for dairy farmers struggling to keep their operations financially viable.
20h ago phys.org
Between bondage and freedom: Life in Civil War refugee camps
Research by assistant professor of history Abigail Cooper into the refugee camps set up for African Americans during the Civil War has revealed stories of courage and bravery and a new understanding of how blacks built a new future for themselves born from the ashes of slavery.
20h ago phys.org
Microplastics: A macro problem
Flying somewhere over the planet, there's a plane equipped with research-grade, double-sided tape on the outside of its hull. Each time the pilot lands the plane, he removes the tape, seals it in a package, and replaces it with a new one before he takes off again. He then mails the package to Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, care of Dimitri Deheyn, Associate Researcher.
20h ago phys.org
Painting of deity found inside 3,000-year-old coffin
Three men, one at each end and one at the middle, slowly and gingerly lifted the wooden lid as if handling a giant eggshell. Quietly offering each other direction and status reports, they glided a few steps and placed the lid atop a Styrofoam support structure for safekeeping.
20h ago phys.org
Chemist synthesizes new compounds with strong antidiabetic properties
A RUDN University chemist has synthesized new derivatives of 1,2,4-triazole that exhibit antidiabetic properties. Experiments showed that these compounds work better than acarbose, a widely used hypoglycemic drug, and demonstrate antioxidant properties. In the future, they can be used to develop drugs against type 2 diabetes. The article is published in the journal Bioorganic Chemistry.
20h ago phys.org
The carbon cost of home delivery and how to avoid it
Delivering online shopping to people's homes is a huge source of greenhouse gas emissions, particularly when deliveries fail and the journey needs to be repeated. Researchers are now re-thinking home deliveries to see if there is a better way of doing things, with ideas including robot couriers, jointly owned parcel lockers and an "Uber' for parcels.
20h ago phys.org
Globular cluster system of NGC 4546 studied in detail
Using the Gemini-South telescope, astronomers have performed a photometric study of the lenticular galaxy NGC 4546. Results of the new research provide more clues about the structure and nature of the galaxy's globular cluster system. The study was published February 7 on arXiv.org.
20h ago phys.org
States with highest rates of melanoma due to ultraviolet radiation identified
A new study finds a wide state-by-state variation in rates of melanoma caused by ultraviolet (UV) exposure with highest rates in several states on the East and West Coast including Hawaii, but also a few landlocked states, including Utah, Vermont, and Minnesota.
20h ago sciencedaily.com
Systems analysis for a new Arctic
A major new report highlights new and emerging policy trends in the Arctic, a region on the front lines of climate change, geopolitics, and global governance.
20h ago sciencedaily.com
The skinny on why poor sleep may increase heart risk in women
A new study suggests that for women, poor sleep could contribute to unhealthy food choices, increasing the risk of obesity and heart disease.
20h ago sciencedaily.com
Combination drug therapy for childhood brain tumors shows promise in laboratory models
In experiments with human cells and mice, researchers report evidence that combining the experimental cancer medication TAK228 (also called sapanisertib) with an existing anti-cancer drug called trametinib may be more effective than either drug alone in decreasing the growth of pediatric low-grade gliomas.
20h ago sciencedaily.com
How dinosaur blood vessels are preserved through the ages
A team of scientists led by Elizabeth Boatman at the University of Wisconsin Stout used infrared and X-ray imaging and spectromicroscopy performed at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source (ALS) to demonstrate how soft tissue structures may be preserved in dinosaur bones—countering the long-standing scientific dogma that protein-based body parts cannot survive more than 1 million years.
20h ago phys.org
Earth climate models and the search for life on other planets
In a generic brick building on the northwestern edge of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center campus in Greenbelt, Maryland, thousands of computers packed in racks the size of vending machines hum in a deafening chorus of data crunching. Day and night, they spit out 7 quadrillion calculations per second. These machines collectively are known as NASA's Discover supercomputer and they are tasked with running sophisticated climate models to predict Earth's future climate.
20h ago phys.org
Climate change is not the only threat for plants
To maintain plant and animal species on earth, we need not only to consider the direct effects of climate change, but we must also take other equally important environmental issues into consideration—such as changes in agricultural and forestry practices and indirect effects of climate such as increased frequencies of fires.
20h ago phys.org
New catalyst recycles greenhouse gases into fuel and hydrogen gas
Scientists have taken a major step toward a circular carbon economy by developing a long-lasting, economical catalyst that recycles greenhouse gases into ingredients that can be used in fuel, hydrogen gas, and other chemicals. The results could be revolutionary in the effort to reverse global warming, according to the researchers. The study was published on February 14 in Science.
21h ago phys.org
Solved: The mystery surrounding dinosaur footprints on a cave ceiling
The mystery surrounding dinosaur footprints on a cave ceiling in Central Queensland has been solved after more than a half a century.
21h ago phys.org
Exotic atomic nuclei reveal traces of new form of superfluidity
Recent observations of the internal structure of the rare isotope ruthenium-88 shed new light on the internal structure of atomic nuclei, a breakthrough that could also lead to further insights into how some chemical elements in nature and their isotopes are formed.
21h ago phys.org
A submillimeter survey of protostars
The formation of stars involves the complex interactions of many phenomena, including gravitational collapse, magnetic fields, turbulence, stellar feedback, and cloud rotation. The balance between these effects varies significantly between sources, and astronomers have adopted a statistical approach to understand the typical, early-stage star formation sequence. The earliest stage is called the protostellar stage. For low-mass stars (those with masses about that of the sun) this stage is usually separated into two subclasses as the star grows by accreting material from a massive envelope whose size can extend between five hundred and ten thousand astronomical units (AU) in a process that can last roughly half a million years. There are considerable uncertainties, however: some gas is ejected back into the medium in strong outflows, for example.
21h ago phys.org
Fieldwork on remote islands for evolutionary study finds rare bats in decline
A study led by Susan Tsang, a former Fulbright Research Fellow from the City College of New York, reveals dwindling populations and widespread hunting throughout Indonesia and the Philippines of the world's largest bats known as flying foxes.
21h ago phys.org
The Super-Cool Materials That Send Heat to Space
Paints, plastics and even wood can be engineered to stay cool in direct sunlight—but their role in displacing power-hungry air conditioners remains unclear -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
21h ago scientificamerican.com
Novel formulation permits use of toxin from rattlesnake venom to treat chronic pain
Crotoxin, extracted from the venom of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus, has been studied for almost a century for its analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antitumor activities and as an even more powerful muscle paralyzer than botulinum toxin. However, the toxicity of crotoxin limits its medicinal use.
22h ago phys.org
The paradox of dormancy: Why sleep when you can eat?
Why do predators sometimes lay dormant eggs, which are hardy, but take a long time to hatch and are expensive to produce? That is the question that researchers from Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) set out to answer in a recent paper published in Advanced Science.
22h ago phys.org
China’s students will now study online because coronavirus has shut schools
22h ago technologyreview.com
Indigenous Lands Ace Biodiversity Measurements
Across the board, indigenous-managed regions equal or surpass conventional conservation areas  -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h ago scientificamerican.com
Extreme weather could bring next recession
Physical climate risk from extreme weather events remains unaccounted for in financial markets. Without better knowledge of the risk, the average energy investor can only hope that the next extreme event won't trigger a sudden correction, according to new research from University of California, Davis.
1d ago phys.org
US peach farmer wins $265 mln damages over Bayer, BASF herbicide
A US jury has awarded $265 million to a Missouri farmer who blamed herbicide from chemical giants Bayer AG and German rival BASF for destroying his peach orchards, in a case set to bolster 140 other lawsuits.
1d ago phys.org
Researchers create new tools to monitor water quality, measure water insecurity
A wife-husband team will present both high-tech and low-tech solutions for improving water security at this year's American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting in Seattle on Sunday, Feb. 16. Northwestern University's Sera Young and Julius Lucks come from different ends of the science spectrum but meet in the middle to provide critical new information to approach this global issue.
1d ago phys.org
How learning about fish can help us save the Amazon rainforest
Think of the Amazon, and you probably think of jaguars, monkeys, or parrots. But many of the rainforest's secrets can be found hidden in its watery depths, from the fish swimming around its rivers and lakes And because these animals live in a river network that spans the South American continent, studying them helps conservationists understand why connected ecosystems are healthy ecosystems. Scientists from the Field Museum investigated fish populations in the South American country of Guyana, which helped to show why aquatic corridors matter in conservation.Their study, which they published in Frontiers in Forests and Global Change, makes an important case that protecting one tiny corner of the Guiana Shield can help protect rivers and biodiversity across the Amazon.
1d ago phys.org
Facial expressions don't tell the whole story of emotion
Facial expressions might not be reliable indicators of emotion, research indicates. In fact, it might be more accurate to say we should never trust a person's face, new research suggests.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Tech Waste Is a Danger to Us All
Industry and governments are ignoring the problem—as well as some simple solutions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d ago blogs.scientificamerican.com
UN: Antarctic high temp records will take months to verify
Record high temperatures reportedly measured in Antarctica will take months to verify, the U.N. weather agency said Sunday.
1d ago phys.org
Recently discovered mineral named for LSU professor
A Louisiana State University geology professor now has a scientific namesake—a newly discovered variety of tourmaline. Barbara Dutrow said she's surprised and thrilled by the honor.
1d ago phys.org
Storm Dennis wreaks havoc across UK, parts of France
Britain on Monday grappled with the fallout from Storm Dennis, with several major incidents declared due to flooding and hundreds of warnings still in place after it battered the country over the weekend.
1d ago phys.org
How to Make the Study of Consciousness Scientifically Tractable
We need to re-examine the idea of "objectivity" in research -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d ago blogs.scientificamerican.com
50, 100 & 150 Years Ago: February 2020 Cooling the Air around Us; The Dangers of Diving
Ice, refrigeration and the technology of chill -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d ago scientificamerican.com
Pebbles, Oceans and Wasp Clocks
There are many ways to gauge planetary change -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d ago blogs.scientificamerican.com
Flight of fancy? Aviation industry tries to go green
From an emissions-reducing model jet that looks like something from a sci-fi movie to electric aircraft and sustainable fuel, the aviation industry is ramping up efforts to go green as consumer pressure grows.
1d ago phys.org
Candy, cheese soar to space station to satisfy crew cravings
A cargo ship rocketed toward the International Space Station on Saturday, carrying candy and cheese to satisfy the astronauts' cravings.
1d ago phys.org
Invasive bug found feeding on avocado plants in Hawaii
An invasive bug was discovered feeding on avocado leaves across the state of Hawaii and was most recently found on Maui plants in retail outlets, entomologists said.
1d ago phys.org
In court, far-reaching psychology tests are unquestioned
Psychological tests are important instruments used in courts to aid legal decisions that profoundly affect people's lives. They can help determine anything from parental fitness for child custody, to the sanity or insanity of a person at the time of a crime, to eligibility for capital punishment.
1d ago phys.org
Journalism is an 'attack surface' for those who spread misinformation
For all the benefits in the expansion of the media landscape, we're still struggling with the spread of misinformation—and the damage is especially worrisome when it comes to information about science and health.
1d ago phys.org
Hollywood and Gun Violence
Movies alone don’t cause people to misuse firearms—but if they even just contribute, the film industry should take responsibility -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2d ago blogs.scientificamerican.com
January 2020: Earth's Warmest January on Record
The month was our planet’s warmest ever recorded without an El Niño being present -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2d ago blogs.scientificamerican.com
'Fight or Flight' Nerves Make Mice Go Gray
A new study in mice concludes stress can cause gray hair—and credits overactive nerves with the change in hue. Karen Hopkin reports.  -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2d ago flex.acast.com
3 Strategies for Eating Healthier--Which One Works Best?
There’s new research on the most effective strategies for changing behavior. Which one is best at helping you eat healthier? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2d ago scientificamerican.com
Computer-generated genomes
Chemists have described how computational algorithms paired with chemical DNA synthesis enable digital manufacturing of biological systems up to the size of entire microbial genomes. They have made insights related to the design, building and testing of a computer-generated bacterial genome and can discuss how algorithms simplify the synthesis of genomes to advance understanding of living systems.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
New technologies, strategies expanding search for extraterrestrial life
New technologies that enable new strategies are revitalizing the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI), by not only augmenting the traditional search for intelligently-generated radio signals but also allowing searches for other signs of life and technological activity.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
The Cancer Industry: Hype vs. Reality
Cancer medicine generates enormous revenues but marginal benefits for patients -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2d ago blogs.scientificamerican.com
Australian bushfires extinguished, but climate rows rage on
Australia's "black summer" of devastating bushfires is finally coming to a close, but bitter arguments over how to tackle climate-fuelled disasters are raging on.
2/15/2020 phys.org
Wind delays Northrop Grumman's supply run to space station
High wind delayed Northrop Grumman's supply run to the International Space Station on Friday.
2/15/2020 phys.org
Earth's cousins: Upcoming missions to look for 'biosignatures' in exoplanet atmospheres
Scientists have discovered thousands of exoplanets, including dozens of terrestrial—or rocky—worlds in the habitable zones around their parent stars. A promising approach to search for signs of life on these worlds is to probe exoplanet atmospheres for "biosignatures"—quirks in chemical composition that are telltale signs of life. For example, thanks to photosynthesis, our atmosphere is nearly 21% oxygen, a much higher level than expected given Earth's composition, orbit and parent star.
2/15/2020 phys.org
New CRISPR-based tool can probe and control several genetic circuits at once
Every cell in our body has a computer-like control system that sends biological signals through thousands of circuits to monitor the cell's needs and regulate its responses.
2/15/2020 phys.org
Biologists rush to re-create the China coronavirus from its DNA code
Synthetic versions of the deadly virus could help test treatments. But what are the risks when viruses can be synthetized from scratch?
2/15/2020 technologyreview.com
Breakthrough Listen releases 2 petabytes of data from SETI survey of Milky Way
The Breakthrough Listen Initiative today released data from the most comprehensive survey yet of radio emissions from the plane of the Milky Way Galaxy and the region around its central black hole, and it is inviting the public to search the data for signals from intelligent civilizations.
2/15/2020 phys.org
New technologies, strategies expanding search for extraterrestrial life
Emerging technologies and new strategies are opening a revitalized era in the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI). New discovery capabilities, along with the rapidly-expanding number of known planets orbiting stars other than the Sun, are spurring innovative approaches by both government and private organizations, according to a panel of experts speaking at a meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Seattle, Washington.
2/15/2020 phys.org
Molecule offers hope for halting Parkinson's
A promising molecule has offered hope for a new treatment that could stop or slow Parkinson's, something no treatment can currently do.
2/15/2020 sciencedaily.com
To help wildlife move, researchers map both natural and legal boundaries
Researchers have developed a way to find the path of least resistance in creating wildlife corridors by mapping not only habitat but also the types of legal authority governing the landscape. They demonstrate this by mapping the streams in an entire county in northeastern Washington that stretches from the Rocky Mountain foothills to the Cascades.
2/15/2020 sciencedaily.com
Physically producing computer-generated artificial genomes to understand DNA
The molecular blueprint of life is stored in DNA within the genome. The digital revolution in biology, driven by DNA sequencing, enables scientists to read the genomes of the many microbes and multicellular organisms that populate our world. Today, DNA sequences of over 200,000 microbial genomes are deposited in digital genome databases and have exponentially increased the understanding of how DNA programs living systems. Using this incredible treasure trove of molecular building blocks, bioengineers learn to sequence and synthesize long DNA molecules and to breed useful microbes with the help of computers.
2/15/2020 phys.org
To help wildlife move, researchers map both natural and legal boundaries
Wildlife need to move to survive: to find food, reproduce and escape wildfires and other hazards. Yet as soon as they leave protected areas like national forests or parks, they often wind up on a landscape that is very fragmented in terms of natural boundaries and human ones.
2/14/2020 phys.org
NASA catches the re-birth of zombie tropical cyclone Francisco
The low-pressure area that had once been Tropical Cyclone Francisco has been lingering in the Southern Indian Ocean since Feb. 6 when it weakened below tropical cyclone status. Since then, Francisco's remnants moved into an area of warm waters and low wind shear allowing the low-pressure area to re-organize, consolidate and re-form. NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of the zombie storm.
2/14/2020 phys.org
Solar wind samples suggest new physics of massive solar ejections
A new study led by the University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa has helped refine understanding of the amount of hydrogen, helium and other elements present in violent outbursts from the Sun, and other types of solar "wind," a stream of ionized atoms ejected from the Sun.
2/14/2020 phys.org
Major study shows climate change can cause abrupt impacts on dryland ecosystems
A study finds for the first time that as levels of aridity increase due to climate change, abrupt changes are experienced on dryland ecosystems.
2/14/2020 sciencedaily.com
Rare bats in decline
A study led by Susan Tsang, a former Fulbright Research Fellow from The City College of New York, reveals dwindling populations and widespread hunting throughout Indonesia and the Philippines of the world's largest bats, known as flying foxes.
2/14/2020 sciencedaily.com
Solar wind samples suggest new physics of massive solar ejections
A new study has helped refine understanding of the amount of hydrogen, helium and other elements present in violent outbursts from the Sun, and other types of solar 'wind,' a stream of ionized atoms ejected from the Sun.
2/14/2020 sciencedaily.com
Researchers were not right about left brains
The left and right side of the brain are involved in different tasks. This functional lateralization and associated brain asymmetry are well documented in humans. Scientists now challenge the long-held notion that the human pattern of brain asymmetry is unique. They found the same asymmetry pattern in chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans. However, humans were the most variable in this pattern. This suggests that lateralized, uniquely human cognitive abilities evolved by adapting a presumably ancestral asymmetry pattern.
2/14/2020 sciencedaily.com
Low-cost 'smart' diaper can notify caregiver when it's wet
Researchers have developed a ''smart'' diaper embedded with a moisture sensor that can alert a caregiver when a diaper is wet. When the sensor detects dampness in the diaper, it sends a signal to a nearby receiver, which in turn can send a notification to a smartphone or computer.
2/14/2020 sciencedaily.com
Device mimics brain cells used for human vision
In a study featured as the cover article appearing today in the journal Science Advances, a UCF research team showed that by combining two promising nanomaterials into a new superstructure, they could create a nanoscale device that mimics the neural pathways of brain cells used for human vision.
2/14/2020 sciencedaily.com
Will Past Criminals Reoffend? Humans Are Terrible at Guessing, and Computers Aren't Much Better
A new study finds algorithms’ predictions are slightly superior but not under all circumstances -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2/14/2020 scientificamerican.com
Warmer climate leads to current trends of social unrest and mass migration: study
Research by an international team of scientists led by University of New Mexico Professor Yemane Asmerom suggests contraction of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) during a warming Earth, leading in turn to drying of the Neotropics, including Central America, and aggravating current trends of social unrest and mass migration.
2/14/2020 phys.org
How did dinosaur parents know when their kids had a fever?
From the time that dinosaur fossils were first discovered, these creatures have fascinated scientists and laypeople alike. In the academic world, their remains provide important clues into the prehistoric world; in popular culture, dinosaurs have inspired blockbuster hits, such as Jurassic Park and King Kong.
2/14/2020 phys.org
Researchers develop device that mimics brain cells used for human vision
University of Central Florida researchers are helping to close the gap separating human and machine minds.
2/14/2020 phys.org
Delta Air Lines to invest $1 bn to reduce emissions
Delta Air Lines said Friday it plans to invest $1 billion over the next decade to reduce its emissions, the first major airline to make such a commitment.
2/14/2020 phys.org
Researchers study how birds retweet news
Every social network has its fake news. And in animal communication networks, even birds discern the trustworthiness of their neighbors, a study from the University of Montana suggests.
2/14/2020 phys.org
Coral reefs: Centuries of human impact
Coral reefs account for one-third of all biodiversity in the oceans and are vital to humanity. But long-standing human stressors including agricultural run-off and overfishing and more recent ocean warming from climate change have all contributed to large-scale coral reef die-offs.
2/14/2020 phys.org