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Move over, Honeycrisp: New apple to debut at grocery stores
They call it the Cosmic Crisp. It's not a video game, a superhero or the title of a Grateful Dead song.
10/19/2019 phys.org
Egypt unveils trove of ancient coffins excavated in Luxor
Egypt revealed Saturday a rare trove of 30 ancient wooden coffins that have been well-preserved over millennia in the archaeologically rich Valley of the Kings in Luxor.
10/19/2019 phys.org
Researchers quantify Cas9-caused off-target mutagenesis in mice
Scientists are finding new ways to improve the use of the CRISPR enzyme Cas9 and reduce the chances of off-target mutations in laboratory mice, according to new results. The findings will help scientists contextualize a common concern related to gene editing and identify new strategies to improve its precision.
2h ago sciencedaily.com
Limiting mealtimes may increase your motivation for exercise
Limiting access to food in mice increases levels of the hormone, ghrelin, which may also increase motivation to exercise, according to a new study. The study suggests that a surge in levels of appetite-promoting hormone, ghrelin, after a period of fasting prompted mice to initiate voluntary exercise.
2h ago sciencedaily.com
Aerogel Mars
A novel idea for the local terraforming of Mars raises interesting possibilities -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h ago blogs.scientificamerican.com
How Can We Curb the Spread of Scientific Racism?
A new book examines the insidious effects of scientific investigations into race -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h ago blogs.scientificamerican.com
Recommended Books, October 2019
50 things to see in the night sky, untold stories of mathematical Americans, and more -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h ago scientificamerican.com
Canada Gets Its First Smilodon
Fossils found near Medicine Hat, Alberta, expand the saber-tooth cat’s range by more than 600 miles -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h ago blogs.scientificamerican.com
Russian "CRISPR-Baby" Scientist Has Started Editing Genes in Human Eggs with the Goal of Altering Deaf Gene
Denis Rebrikov says that he does not plan to implant gene-edited embryos until he gets regulatory approval -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h ago scientificamerican.com
Transforming sulphur dioxide from harmful to useful
Scientists have created molecular cages within a polymer to trap harmful sulphur dioxide pollution in order to transform it into useful compounds and reduce waste and emissions.
16h ago phys.org
Mars 2020 unwrapped and ready for testing
In this time-lapse video, taken on Oct. 4, 2019, at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, bunny-suited engineers remove the inner layer of protective antistatic foil on the Mars 2020 rover after the vehicle was relocated from JPL's Spacecraft Assembly Facility to the Simulator Building for testing.
16h ago phys.org
NASA's planetary protection review addresses changing reality of space exploration
NASA released a report Friday with recommendations from the Planetary Protection Independent Review Board (PPIRB) the agency established in response to a recent National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine report and a recommendation from the NASA Advisory Council.
16h ago phys.org
Young climate activists in Africa struggle to be heard
As Greta Thunberg and the Extinction Rebellion inspire climate protesters across the globe, young African activists say they still struggle to make themselves heard.
16h ago phys.org
Thunberg brings her climate protest to Canada's oil patch
Teen activist Greta Thunberg rallied with climate change protesters in Canada's oil-rich province of Albert on Friday, as oil workers counter-protested by honking the horns of their big rigs.
16h ago phys.org
NASA-NOAA satellite finds overshooting tops, gravity waves in Tropical Storm Nestor
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided night-time and infrared views of developing Tropical Storm Nestor in the Gulf of Mexico and found over-shooting cloud tops and gravity waves. When the satellite passed over the potential tropical depression early on Oct. 18, it was consolidating. Less than 12 hours later, it became a tropical storm.
16h ago phys.org
Land management practices to reduce nitrogen load may be affected by climate changes
Nitrogen from agricultural production is a major cause of pollution in the Mississippi River Basin and contributes to large dead zones in the Gulf of Mexico.
16h ago phys.org
UK veterinary profession simply not ready for 'no deal' Brexit
The UK veterinary profession is simply not prepared for a 'No Deal' Brexit, warns the editor of Vet Record.
16h ago phys.org
SNAP provides a model for ensuring a right to food
Alleviating food insecurity is often seen as one of the fundamental roles a country should fulfill. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is effective in addressing the right to food in the US, and that the program can serve as an example for countries that struggle to provide food for all citizens.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Land management practices to reduce nitrogen load may be affected by climate changes
Nitrogen from agricultural production is a major cause of pollution in the Mississippi River Basin and contributes to large dead zones in the Gulf of Mexico. Illinois and other Midwestern states have set goals to reduce nitrogen load through strategies that include different land management practices. A new study uses computer modeling to estimate how those practices may be affected by potential changes in the climate, such as increased rainfall.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Atmospheric pressure impacts greenhouse gas emissions from leaky oil and gas wells
Fluctuations in atmospheric pressure can heavily influence how much natural gas leaks from wells below the ground surface at oil and gas sites, according to new research. However, current monitoring strategies do not take this phenomenon into account, and therefore may be under- or over-estimating the true magnitude of gas emissions.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Mars once had salt lakes similar to those on Earth
Mars once had salt lakes that are similar to those on Earth and has gone through wet and dry periods.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Why respiratory infections are more deadly in those with diabetes
Researchers have demonstrated how diabetes contributes to mortality from MERS-CoV infections, and the finding could shed light on why other respiratory illnesses like the flu or pneumonia might strike those with diabetes more severely.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Novel nanoprobes show promise for optical monitoring of neural activity
Researchers have developed ultrasensitive nanoscale optical probes to monitor the bioelectric activity of neurons and other excitable cells. This novel readout technology could enable scientists to study how neural circuits function at an unprecedented scale by monitoring large numbers of individual neurons simultaneously. It could also lead to high-bandwidth brain-machine interfaces with dramatically enhanced precision and functionality.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Young adults with PTSD may have a higher risk of stroke in middle age
Young adults who develop PTSD after a traumatic event (e.g., gun violence, sexual assault, military combat or natural disaster) may be more likely to experience a transient ischemic attack (TIA) or major stroke event by middle age. This nationwide study of more than 1.1 million adults showed that PTSD may be a potent risk factor for developing stroke at a young age.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Wind turbine design and placement can mitigate negative effect on birds
Wind energy is increasingly seen as a sustainable alternative to fossil fuels, as it contributes to a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. However, the rapid expansion of wind farms has raised concerns about the impact of wind turbines on wildlife. A new study provides comprehensive data on how turbines affect bird populations. The study suggests ways to mitigate negative effects through wind turbine design and placement, recommending taller turbines, shorter blades, and placement away from bird habitats.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Deep-sea explorers find sunken warship from key WWII battle
Deep-sea explorers scouring the world's oceans for sunken World War II ships are focusing in on debris fields deep in the Pacific, in an area where one of the most decisive battles of the time took place.
1d ago phys.org
US makes history with first all-female spacewalk
US astronauts Christina Koch and Jessica Meir on Friday became the first all-female pairing to carry out a spacewalk—a historic milestone as NASA prepares to send the first woman to the Moon.
1d ago phys.org
Negative news coverage empowers collective action in minorities
When minorities perceive negative news about their racial ethnic groups as inaccurate, some believe they have the power to enact change.
1d ago phys.org
Atmospheric pressure impacts greenhouse gas emissions from leaky oil and gas wells
Fluctuations in atmospheric pressure can heavily influence how much natural gas leaks from wells below the ground surface at oil and gas sites, according to new University of British Columbia research. However, current monitoring strategies do not take this phenomenon into account, and therefore may be under- or over-estimating the true magnitude of gas emissions.
1d ago phys.org
NASA-NOAA satellite observes development of Tropical Storm Octave
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided infrared data that showed the development of Tropical Storm Octave in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.
1d ago phys.org
NASA-NOAA satellite finds Tropical Storm Neoguri consolidating
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center with a visible image of Tropical Storm Neoguri that showed it had become more organized over the previous 24 hours.
1d ago phys.org
Red tide continues to spread around southwest Florida
Red tide algae showed up in test samples again this week, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's weekly report.
1d ago phys.org
Kayakers find partially fossilized bear skull in Kansas
Two sisters have found a partially fossilized bear skull while kayaking the Arkansas River in south-central Kansas.
1d ago phys.org
South Africa to increase coal-fired energy, sparking climate outcry
South Africa's government announced Friday that the country would increase its use of coal-fired energy, provoking outrage from climate groups.
1d ago phys.org
Creatine powers T cells' fight against cancer
The study, conducted in mice, is the first to show that creatine uptake is critical to the anti-tumor activities of killer T cells, the foot soldiers of the immune system.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Why modified carbon nanotubes can help the reproducibility problem
Scientists have conducted an in-depth study on how carbon nanotubes with oxygen-containing groups can be used to greatly enhance the performance of perovskite solar cells. The newly discovered self-recrystallization ability of perovskite could lead to improvement of low-cost and efficient perovskite solar cells.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
New device to be tested off Outer Banks could help save sharks from commercial fishing all over the world
An Outer Banks fisherman next summer will test a device about the size of a spark plug that could save rare sharks.
1d ago phys.org
Big data, artificial intelligence to support research on harmful blue-green algae
A team of scientists from research centers stretching from Maine to South Carolina will develop and deploy high-tech tools to explore cyanobacteria in lakes across the East Coast.
1d ago phys.org
Tennessee researchers join call for responsible development of synthetic biology
Engineering biology is already transforming technology and science, and a consortium of researchers across many disciplines in the international Genome Project-write is calling for more discussion among scientists, policy makers and the general public to shepherd future development. In a policy forum article published in the October 18 issue of Science, the authors outline the technological advances needed to secure the transformative future of synthetic biology and express their concerns that the implementation of the relatively new discipline remains safe and responsible.
1d ago phys.org
All plastic waste could become new, high-quality plastic through advanced steam cracking
A research group at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, has developed an efficient process for breaking down any plastic waste to a molecular level. The resulting gases can then be transformed back into new plastics—of the same quality as the original. The new process could transform today's plastic factories into recycling refineries, within the framework of their existing infrastructure.
1d ago phys.org
Deep learning method transforms shapes
Called LOGAN, the deep neural network, i.e., a machine of sorts, can learn to transform the shapes of two different objects, for example, a chair and a table, in a natural way, without seeing any paired transforms between the shapes.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
A new discovery: How our memories stabilize while we sleep
Scientists have shown that delta waves emitted while we sleep are not generalized periods of silence during which the cortex rests, as has been described for decades in the scientific literature. Instead, they isolate assemblies of neurons that play an essential role in long-term memory formation.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Potato as effective as carbohydrate gels for boosting athletic performance, study finds
Consuming potato puree during prolonged exercise works just as well as a commercial carbohydrate gel in sustaining blood glucose levels and boosting performance in trained athletes, scientists report.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Candidate Ebola vaccine still effective when highly diluted, macaque study finds
A single dose of a highly diluted VSV-Ebola virus (EBOV) vaccine -- approximately one-millionth of what is in the vaccine being used to help control the ongoing Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo -- remains fully protective against disease in experimentally infected monkeys, according to scientists. The investigators completed the dosage study using cynomolgus macaques and an updated vaccine component to match the EBOV Makona strain that circulated in West Africa from 2014-16.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Cutting-edge neuroethics with ground-breaking neurotechnologies
Scientists are developing powerful new devices and technologies to monitor and regulate brain activity. To ensure NIH keeps pace with rapid technological development and help clinicians and researchers ethically fit these new tools into practice, a new article highlights potential issues around and offers recommendations about clinical research with both invasive and noninvasive neural devices.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Stress in the powerhouse of the cell
Researchers discover a new principle -- how cells protect themselves from mitochondrial defects.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Is there anything we can do to tackle space debris?
Your space questions, answered.
1d ago technologyreview.com
Can the design of a building improve the creative output of its occupants?
A ground-breaking study published in the September issue of the scholarly Creativity Research Journal found increased creativity in employees who worked in a building designed according to Maharishi Vastu architecture. In this first study of its kind, employees of an architecture and engineering firm, based in a major metropolitan city in the Eastern United States, moved into a Maharishi Vastu office building and scored higher on the standardized Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (TTCT) compared to their score four months earlier in their previous location. In particular, they generated 50-80% more original ideas. The study found that there was less than a 1% possibility that the result was due to chance.
1d ago phys.org
Bean tree plan to protect Amazon
Amazon deforestation could be slowed by planting bean trees that would keep soils fertile and help smallholders make a living.
1d ago phys.org
Flexible, wearable supercapacitors based on porous nanocarbon nanocomposites
Evening gowns with interwoven LEDs may look extravagant, but the light sources need a constant power supply from devices that are as well wearable, durable, and lightweight. Chinese scientists have manufactured fibrous electrodes for wearable devices that are flexible and excel by their high energy density. Key for the preparation of the electrode material was a microfluidic technology, as shown in the journal Angewandte Chemie.
1d ago phys.org
Genes linked to sex ratio and male fertility in mice
One of the more recent trends among parents-to-be is the so-called gender reveal, a party complete with pink or blue cake to answer the burning question, "Is it a boy or girl?" After all, it's presumed that there's a 50-50 chance you'd have one or the other. In a new article published in Current Biology, Michigan Medicine researchers studying the sex chromosomes have discovered genes that, at least in mice, skew that assumed ratio to favor one sex and that could have major implications for male infertility.
1d ago phys.org
Flexible, wearable supercapacitors based on porous nanocarbon nanocomposites
Evening gowns with interwoven LEDs may look extravagant, but the light sources need a constant power supply from devices that are as well wearable, durable, and lightweight. Chinese scientists have manufactured fibrous electrodes for wearable devices that are flexible and excel by their high energy density. A microfluidic technology was key for the preparation of the electrode material was a microfluidic technology, as shown in the journal Angewandte Chemie.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
New stable form of plutonium discovered
An international team of scientists, led by the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), have found a new compound of plutonium with an unexpected, pentavalent oxidation state, using the ESRF, the European Synchrotron, Grenoble, France. This new phase of plutonium is solid and stable, and may be a transient phase in radioactive waste repositories. The results are published this week in Angewandte Chemie as a Very Important Paper (VIP).
1d ago phys.org
Momentum Builds for Hydrogen Fuel in Japan, Australia
Lowered costs and the availability of renewable energy to produce hydrogen are raising interest in the fuel source -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d ago scientificamerican.com
Genes linked to sex ratio and male fertility in mice
Researchers find genes that help maintain the 50-50 balance between male and female offspring in mice -- and that have major implications for male infertility.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Climate: Uncertainty in scientific predictions can help and harm credibility
The ways climate scientists explain their predictions about the impact of global warming can either promote or limit their persuasiveness.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
A new stable form of plutonium discovered
Scientists have found a new compound of plutonium with an unexpected, pentavalent oxidation state. This new phase of plutonium is solid and stable, and may be a transient phase in radioactive waste repositories.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
All plastic waste could become new, high-quality plastic through advanced steam cracking
A research group has developed an efficient process for breaking down any plastic waste to a molecular level. The resulting gases can then be transformed back into new plastics - of the same quality as the original. The new process could transform today's plastic factories into recycling refineries, within the framework of their existing infrastructure.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Easy at-home assessment of teeth grinding in sleep
An easy-to-use electrode set can assess sleep bruxism severity as well as a conventional polysomnography, a new study shows.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Lifestyle is a threat to gut bacteria: Ötzi proves it, study shows
The evolution of dietary and hygienic habits in Western countries is associated with a decrease in the bacteria that help in digestion. These very bacteria were also found in the Iceman, who lived 5300 years ago, and are still present in non-Westernized populations in various parts of the world. The depletion of the microbiome may be associated with the increased prevalence, in Western countries, of complex conditions like allergies, autoimmune and gastrointestinal diseases, obesity.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Preventing streptococci infections
Researchers have discovered an enzyme they believe could be key to preventing Group A Streptococcus infections that cause more than 500,000 deaths worldwide each year. The enzyme works through a novel mechanism of action that can also be found in other streptococcal species, increasing the impact and relevance of this finding.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
What Is Death, Exactly?
Even in a hospital setting, the answer is far from straightforward -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d ago blogs.scientificamerican.com
Neanderthal and Denisovan DNA may have helped early Melanesian people survive
A team of researchers from the U.S., Italy and France has found evidence that suggests DNA inherited from Neanderthals and Denisovans may have helped early Melanesian people survive in their island environment. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their genetic study of Melanesian people and what they found.
1d ago phys.org
Use the Amazon's natural bounty to save it: experts
Brazilian prize-winning climatologist Carlos Nobre is calling for a bioeconomic plan to save the Amazon by drawing on its wealth of berries and nuts—an idea championed at a key Vatican summit.
1d ago phys.org
First all-female spacewalking team makes history
The world's first all-female spacewalking team made history high above Earth on Friday, replacing a broken part of the International Space Station's power grid.
1d ago phys.org
Evolution tells us we might be the only intelligent life in the universe
Are we alone in the universe? It comes down to whether intelligence is a probable outcome of natural selection, or an improbable fluke. By definition, probable events occur frequently, improbable events occur rarely—or once. Our evolutionary history shows that many key adaptations—not just intelligence, but complex animals, complex cells, photosynthesis, and life itself—were unique, one-off events, and therefore highly improbable. Our evolution may have been like winning the lottery … only far less likely.
1d ago phys.org
Origin and chemical makeup of Saturn's Moon Titan's dunes
Astronomers exposed acetylene ice -- a chemical that is used on Earth in welding torches and exists at Titan's equatorial regions -- at low temperatures to proxies of high-energy galactic cosmic rays.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Researchers call for responsible development of synthetic biology
Engineering biology is transforming technology and science. Researchers outline the technological advances needed to secure a safe, responsible future.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
A higher resolution image of human lung development
Researchers provide clearer picture of how lungs develop and discover novel markers to differentiate populations of lung cells implicated in lung diseases of premature babies.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Adoption and fostering: Matching religion and ethnicity makes for happier families
There are around 75,000 children in England who live in care—73% of these children will be fostered and for 3% of these children adoption will be their route to a loving, safe and permanent home.
1d ago phys.org
Image: Hubble snags starry galaxy
In this image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, the galaxy NGC 4380 looks like a special effect straight out of a science fiction or fantasy film, swirling like a gaping portal to another dimension.
1d ago phys.org
More than just whale food: Krill's influence on carbon dioxide and global climate
Antarctic krill are well-known for their role at the base of the Southern Ocean food web, where they're food for marine predators such as seals, penguins and whales.
1d ago phys.org
Discovery raises hopes of preventing streptococci infections
Researchers at the University of Dundee have discovered an enzyme they believe could be key to preventing Group A Streptococcus infections that cause more than 500,000 deaths worldwide each year.
1d ago phys.org
Europe's largest meteorite crater home to deep ancient life
Fractured rocks of impact craters have been suggested to host deep microbial communities on Earth, and potentially other terrestrial planets, yet direct evidence remains elusive. In a new study published in Nature Communications, a team of researchers shows that the largest impact crater in Europe, the Siljan impact structure, Sweden, has hosted long-term deep microbial activity.
1d ago phys.org
Energy flow in the nano range
Plants and bacteria can capture the energy of sunlight with light-harvesting antennas and transfer it to a reaction center. Transporting energy efficiently and in a targeted fashion in a minimum of space is also of interest to engineers. If they were to master as well as microorganisms, they could significantly improve photovoltaics and optoelectronics.
1d ago phys.org
Mathematicians report way to facilitate problem solving in queueing theory
RUDN University mathematicians proved a theorem that will facilitate the solution of problems in queueing theory—a branch of mathematics that describes query chains, for example, in the service sector. These results can be applied in industry, information technology, and neural networks theory. The study is published in Engineering and Informational Sciences.
1d ago phys.org
Paving a way to achieve unexplored semiconductor nanostructures
A research team paved a way to achieve unexplored III-V semiconductor nanostructures. They grew branched GaAs nanowires with a nontoxic Bi element employing characteristic structural modifications correlated with metallic droplets, as well as crystalline defects and orientations. The finding provides a rational design concept for the creation of semiconductor nanostructures with the concentration of constituents beyond the fundamental limit, making it potentially applicable to novel efficient near-infrared devices and quantum electronics.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
A compound effective to chemotherapy-resistant cancer cells identified
A compound effective in killing chemotherapy-resistant glioblastoma-initiating cells (GICs) has been identified, raising hopes of producing drugs capable of eradicating refractory tumors with low toxicity.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Oddness of Australian creatures goes way back
Australian creatures like the echidna and the koala are celebrated for their oddness. The fossil record shows that this oddity reaches far back into prehistory, as illustrated in the form of a fossil horseshoe crab found in Tasmania that has been renamed by UNE paleontologist Dr. Russell Bicknell.
1d ago phys.org
Is your horse normal? Now there's an app for that
Since ancient times, horse behavior, and the bond between horses and humans, has been a source of intrigue and fascination.
1d ago phys.org
Can Love Actually Last?
Dr. Ellen Hendriksen looks at the many permutations of love, including everlasting love, which, it turns out, doesn’t just happen in fairytales -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d ago scientificamerican.com
Croissant making inspires renewable energy solution
The art of croissant making has inspired researchers to find a solution to a sustainable energy problem.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Increase health benefits of exercise by working out before breakfast
Exercising before eating breakfast burns more fat, improves how the body responds to insulin and lowers people's risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Whole genome sequencing could help save pumas from inbreeding
The first complete genetic sequences of individual mountain lions point the way to better conservation strategies for saving threatened populations of the wild animals.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
New diagnostic method finds aggressive tumors
Researchers have developed a new cheap method that can identify highly heterogeneous tumors that tend to be very aggressive, and therefore need to be treated more aggressively.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
'Flamenco dancing' molecule could lead to better-protecting sunscreen
A molecule that protects plants from overexposure to harmful sunlight thanks to its flamenco-style twist could form the basis for a new longer-lasting sunscreen, chemists have found.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Newly discovered virus infects bald eagles across America
Researchers have discovered a previously unknown virus infecting nearly a third of America's bald eagle population. Scientists found the virus while searching for the cause of Wisconsin River Eagle Syndrome, an enigmatic disease endemic to bald eagles near the Lower Wisconsin River. The newly identified bald eagle hepacivirus, or BeHV, may contribute to the fatal disease, which causes eagles to stumble and have seizures.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Energy flow in the nano range
It is crucial for photovoltaics and other technical applications, how efficiently energy spreads in a small volume. With new methods, the path of energy in the nanometer range can now be followed precisely.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Glowing to the bottom
In the dark depths of the ocean, pretty much the only sources of light are the animals that live there. Whether flashing, glimmering, or emitting glowing liquids, many deep-sea animals are able to produce light (bioluminesce). MBARI researchers recently found that animals that live on the seafloor are much less likely to produce light than those swimming or drifting in the "midwater."
1d ago phys.org
Ever wondered why your wine is weeping? Blame shock waves.
For centuries, scientists have pondered the “tears” that form in wine glasses. Now they think they know how it happens.
1d ago technologyreview.com
Quantum spacetime on a quantum simulator
Quantum simulation plays an irreplaceable role in diverse fields, beyond the scope of classical computers. In a recent study, Keren Li and an interdisciplinary research team at the Center for Quantum Computing, Quantum Science and Engineering and the Department of Physics and Astronomy in China, U.S. Germany and Canada. Experimentally simulated spin-network states by simulating quantum spacetime tetrahedra on a four-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) quantum simulator. The experimental fidelity was above 95 percent. The research team used the quantum tetrahedra prepared by nuclear magnetic resonance to simulate a two-dimensional (2-D) spinfoam vertex (model) amplitude, and display local dynamics of quantum spacetime. Li et al. measured the geometric properties of the corresponding quantum tetrahedra to simulate their interactions. The experimental work is an initial attempt and a basic module to represent the Feynman diagram vertex in the spinfoam formulation, to study loop quantum gravity (LQG) using quantum information processing. The results are now available on Communication Physics.
1d ago phys.org
China Needs Stronger Ethical Safeguards in Biomedicine
As the country seeks to become a research powerhouse, it must rectify worrisome practices -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d ago scientificamerican.com
What's behind surge in unaccompanied minors crossing southern U.S. border?
In 2010, just over 18,000 unaccompanied minors were detained by U.S. immigration authorities crossing the U.S-Mexico border. The number spiked to crisis levels in 2014, but then decreased. Now the numbers are rising again, with more than 72,000 unaccompanied children apprehended this year as of August. Lauren R. Aronson, an associate clinical professor of law and the director of the Immigration Law Clinic at the College of Law, spoke with News Bureau business and law editor Phil Ciciora about the rise in unaccompanied minors.
1d ago phys.org
Nitrogen-embedded polycyclic compound with strong antiaromaticity and stability
Nitrogen-embedded polycyclic compounds with strong antiaromaticity and stability were synthesized and isolated for the first time using pyrrole as a key unit. An expedited approach toward stable antiaromatic polycyclic compounds enables not only the revealing of its fundamental properties, but also its application to organic electronic materials.
1d ago phys.org
Surfing on waves in a one-dimensional quantum liquid
Physicists from the University of Luxembourg, together with international collaborators, have recently published an article in the internationally renowned journal Physical Review Letters. In this article, they demonstrate how quantum-mechanical interference effects could allow experimenters to better study the properties of particles trapped in quantum liquids via resonances in the absorption spectrum.
1d ago phys.org
Paving a way to achieve unexplored semiconductor nanostructures
A research team of Ehime University paved a way to achieve unexplored III-V semiconductor nanostructures. They grew branched GaAs nanowires with a nontoxic Bi element employing characteristic structural modifications correlated with metallic droplets, as well as crystalline defects and orientations. The finding provides a rational design concept for the creation of semiconductor nanostructures with the concentration of constituents beyond the fundamental limit, making it potentially applicable to novel efficient near-infrared devices and quantum electronics.
1d ago phys.org
Manufacturing minerals could transform the gem market, medical industries, and mitigate climate change
Last month, scientists uncovered a mineral called Edscottite. Minerals are solid, naturally occurring substances that are not living, such as quartz or hematite. This new mineral was discovered after an examination of the Wedderburn Meteorite, a metallic-looking rock found in Central Victoria back in 1951.
1d ago phys.org
An evolution in the understanding of evolution
Remember domain, kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus, species and Charles Darwin's "tree of life" metaphor we learned about in high school biology? That way of describing living-things lineages is just science's best guess about how genes have mutated and split over time to change things into what they are today.
1d ago phys.org
Scientists develop a lithium-ion battery that won't catch fire
A flexible lithium-ion battery designed by a team of researchers from the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory and built to operate under extreme conditions—including cutting, submersion, and simulated ballistic impact—can now add incombustible to its résumé.
1d ago phys.org
A better way to screen cats for heart disease
Cats are very good at hiding their health problems, a survival instinct from their wild ancestors, when showing weakness made them easier prey. One health problem they hide is heart disease, meaning it can progress to become life-threatening before it's noticed.
1d ago phys.org
Reforesting is a good idea, but it is necessary to know where and how
An article recently published in Science, titled "The global tree restoration potential," presented what it called "the most effective solution at our disposal to mitigate climate change." The lead author is Jean-François Bastin, an ecologist affiliated with the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich). The article reports the results of a study in which Bastin and collaborators used remote sensing and modeling techniques to estimate that forest restoration in areas totaling 900 million hectares worldwide could store 205 gigatons of carbon.
1d ago phys.org
Imaging combined with genetic screening of cells enhances genomic discoveries
Scientists routinely use genetic screens to perturb, or change the activity of, genes in mammalian cells, one at a time, to learn what those genes do. Pooled screens take this same approach but typically involve many more genetic perturbations across the whole genome. However, with pooled screens, scientists could only track cell survival and other simple whole-cell measurements.
1d ago phys.org
New catalyst helps turn carbon dioxide into fuel
Imagine grabbing carbon dioxide from car exhaust pipes and other sources and turning this main greenhouse gas into fuels like natural gas or propane: a sustainability dream come true.
1d ago phys.org
Stress test separates tough bacteria from the tender
Bacteria. Sometimes we can't live with 'em, but there's a growing appreciation that we can't live without 'em. Whether it's disease-causing pathogens or beneficial species that live in communities known as microbiomes, scientists agree on one thing—we need to know more about bacteria, particularly how they are built and how they live together.
1d ago phys.org
Technology exposed Syrian war crimes over and over. Was it for nothing?
Activists on the ground and digital sleuths have spent years documenting chemical attacks and barrel bombs. Now they’re facing a brutal truth.
1d ago technologyreview.com
What You Can't See Can Hurt You
Although much of the U.S. enjoys cleaner air than in previous decades, we still have work to do -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d ago blogs.scientificamerican.com
Whole genome sequencing could help save pumas from inbreeding
When students at the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) found a dead mule deer on campus, they figured it had been killed by coyotes. Wildlife biologist Chris Wilmers rigged up a video camera to spy on the carcass at night. But the animal that crept out of the shadows to dine on the deer was no coyote—it was a mountain lion.
1d ago phys.org
Newly discovered virus infects bald eagles across America
Researchers have discovered a previously unknown virus infecting nearly a third of America's bald eagle population.
1d ago phys.org
Molecules in Blood Spike Hours before Seizures
Researchers measured a predictive increase in transfer RNA in people with epilepsy -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d ago scientificamerican.com
Mark Zuckerberg has defended Facebook’s decision to let politicians lie in ads
1d ago technologyreview.com
Deep-sea explorers seek out sunken World War II ships
MIDWAY ATOLL, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (AP)—Deep-sea explorers scouring the world's oceans for sunken World War II ships are honing in on debris fields deep in the Pacific, in an area where one of the most decisive battles of the time took place.
1d ago phys.org
Trial set in New York on Exxon's climate statements
Charges that Exxon Mobil misled investors on the financial risks of climate change will be heard in court this month after a New York judge gave the green light for a trial.
1d ago phys.org
A new approach to reconstructing protein evolution
There are an estimated 20,000 to 30,000 proteins at work in cells, where they carry out numerable functions, says computational molecular biologist Roman Sloutsky at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. "One of the central questions in all of biochemistry and molecular biology," he adds, is how their precisely-tuned functions are determined.
1d ago phys.org
Cod or haddock? Study looks at 'name bias' and fisheries sustainability
Could you taste the difference between cod and other whitefish, such as haddock or hake, if you didn't know what you were eating? The answer may have implications for supporting local fisheries and food sustainability in New England, says UMass Amherst environmental conservation graduate student Amanda Davis.
1d ago phys.org
Researcher invents an easy-to-use technique to measure the hydrophobicity of micro- and nanoparticle
The scientific and industrial communities who work with micro- and nanoparticles continue to labor with the challenge of effective particle dispersion. Most particles that disperse in liquids aggregate rapidly, and eventually precipitate, thereby separating from the liquid phase. While it is commonly accepted that the hydrophobicity of particles— how quickly water repels off a surface—determines their dispersion and aggregation potential, there has been no easy-to-use method to quantitatively determine the hydrophobicity of these tiny particles.
1d ago phys.org
New study uncovers 'magnetic' memory of European glass eels - Phys.org
New study uncovers 'magnetic' memory of European glass eels  Phys.org
1d ago phys.org
Your Skull Shapes Your Hearing
The resonant properties of your skull can amplify some frequencies and dampen others—and, in some cases, affect your hearing. Christopher Intagliata reports.  -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d ago flex.acast.com
New clinical research offers possibility of future rehabilitation for patients in minimally conscious or vegetative state
Non-invasive brain stimulation is to be trialled for the first time alongside advanced brain imaging techniques in patients who are minimally conscious or in a vegetative state.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Big data technique reveals previously unknown capabilities of common materials
Researchers have found a new way to optimize nickel by unlocking properties that could enable numerous applications, from biosensors to quantum computing.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Region, age, and sex decide who gets arthritis-linked 'fabella' knee bone
The once-rare 'fabella' bone has made a dramatic resurgence in human knees, but who's likely to have a fabella or two -- and why?
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Scientists recalculate the optimum binding energy for heterogeneous catalysis
In a discovery that could lead to the development of novel catalysts that do not rely on expensive rare metals, scientists have shown that the optimal binding energy can deviate from traditional calculations, which are based on equilibrium thermodynamics, at high reaction rates. This means that reconsidering the design of catalysts using the new calculations may be necessary to achieve the best rates.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Scientists recalculate the optimum binding energy for heterogeneous catalysis
Determining the optimal binding energies for heterogeneous chemical reactions—usually meaning that the reactant is in the gas or liquid phase while the catalyst is a solid—is critical for many aspects of modern society, as we rely on such reactions for processes as diverse as the production of fertilizers and plastics. There is an optimal binding energy—meaning the degree of interaction between the reactants and the catalyst—where the process is most efficient (if it is too low, the reactants will not react with the catalyst, and if it is too high they will remain bound to it), and catalysts are designed based on this.
1d ago phys.org
Big data technique reveals previously unknown capabilities of common materials
When scientists and engineers discover new ways to optimize existing materials, it paves the way for innovations that make everything from our phones and computers to our medical equipment smaller, faster, and more efficient.
1d ago phys.org
Variation in transplant centers' use of less-than-ideal organs
In 2010-2016, many US transplant centers commonly accepted deceased donor kidneys with less desirable characteristics. The use of these organs varied widely across transplant centers, however, and differences were not fully explained by the size of waitlists or the availability of donor organs.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
Health care intervention: Treating high-need, high-cost patients
Patients with complex needs -- serious mental and physical health problems and substance use disorders -- flock to emergency rooms costing the health care system billions every year. A new study suggests a nontraditional approach to these patients can significantly improve their daily functioning and health outcomes.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
First report of cotton blue disease in the United States
Reported from six counties in coastal Alabama in 2017, cotton blue disease affected approximately 25% of the state's cotton crop and caused a 4% yield loss. The disease was reported again in 2018, affecting 3-100% of cotton fields in Alabama but causing only a 1% yield loss. Symptoms, which include slowed plant growth, loss of chlorophyll, and dwarfing of infected leaves, usually do not appear until last August after full bloom. To date, there are no recommended strategies for management of this disease.
2d ago sciencedaily.com