INFOSCUM
 
Science     Deals     Videos     Podcasts

Today Only
Yesterday Only
Mon, Apr 6, 2020
Sun, Apr 5, 2020
Sat, Apr 4, 2020
Fri, Apr 3, 2020
Thu, Apr 2, 2020
Wed, Apr 1, 2020
Tue, Mar 31, 2020
Mon, Mar 30, 2020
Sun, Mar 29, 2020
Sat, Mar 28, 2020
Fri, Mar 27, 2020
Thu, Mar 26, 2020
Wed, Mar 25, 2020
Tue, Mar 24, 2020
Mon, Mar 23, 2020
Sun, Mar 22, 2020
Sat, Mar 21, 2020
Fri, Mar 20, 2020
Thu, Mar 19, 2020
Wed, Mar 18, 2020
Tue, Mar 17, 2020
Mon, Mar 16, 2020
Sun, Mar 15, 2020
Sat, Mar 14, 2020
Fri, Mar 13, 2020
Thu, Mar 12, 2020
Wed, Mar 11, 2020
Tue, Mar 10, 2020
Mon, Mar 9, 2020
Sun, Mar 8, 2020
Sat, Mar 7, 2020
Fri, Mar 6, 2020
Thu, Mar 5, 2020
Wed, Mar 4, 2020
Tue, Mar 3, 2020
Mon, Mar 2, 2020
Sun, Mar 1, 2020
Sat, Feb 29, 2020
Fri, Feb 28, 2020
Thu, Feb 27, 2020
Wed, Feb 26, 2020
Tue, Feb 25, 2020
Mon, Feb 24, 2020
Sun, Feb 23, 2020
Sat, Feb 22, 2020
Fri, Feb 21, 2020
Thu, Feb 20, 2020
Wed, Feb 19, 2020
Tue, Feb 18, 2020
Mon, Feb 17, 2020
Sun, Feb 16, 2020
Sat, Feb 15, 2020
Fri, Feb 14, 2020
Thu, Feb 13, 2020
Wed, Feb 12, 2020
Tue, Feb 11, 2020
Mon, Feb 10, 2020
Sun, Feb 9, 2020
Sat, Feb 8, 2020
Fri, Feb 7, 2020
Thu, Feb 6, 2020
Wed, Feb 5, 2020
Tue, Feb 4, 2020
Mon, Feb 3, 2020
Sun, Feb 2, 2020
Sat, Feb 1, 2020
Fri, Jan 31, 2020
Thu, Jan 30, 2020
Wed, Jan 29, 2020
Tue, Jan 28, 2020
Mon, Jan 27, 2020
Sun, Jan 26, 2020
Sat, Jan 25, 2020
Fri, Jan 24, 2020
Thu, Jan 23, 2020
Wed, Jan 22, 2020
Tue, Jan 21, 2020
Mon, Jan 20, 2020
Sun, Jan 19, 2020
Sat, Jan 18, 2020
Fri, Jan 17, 2020
Thu, Jan 16, 2020
Wed, Jan 15, 2020
Tue, Jan 14, 2020
Mon, Jan 13, 2020
Sun, Jan 12, 2020
Sat, Jan 11, 2020
Fri, Jan 10, 2020
Thu, Jan 9, 2020
Wed, Jan 8, 2020

Coqui fossil from Puerto Rico takes title of oldest Caribbean frog
The bright chirp of the coquí frog, the national symbol of Puerto Rico, has likely resounded through Caribbean forests for at least 29 million years.
1h ago phys.org
The link between virus spillover, wildlife extinction and the environment
As COVID-19 spreads across the globe, a common question is, can infectious diseases be connected to environmental change? Yes, indicates a study published today from the University of California, Davis' One Health Institute.
1h ago phys.org
It's now or never: Visual events have 100 milliseconds to hit brain target or go unnoticed
Researchers have defined a crucial window of time that mice need to key in on visual events.
3h ago sciencedaily.com
Common coronaviruses are highly seasonal, with most cases peaking in winter months
Of the seven coronaviruses known to infect people, four cause common respiratory infections that are sharply seasonal and appear to transmit similarly to influenza, according to a new study.
3h ago sciencedaily.com
How forest loss leads to spread of disease
In Uganda, loss of forested habitat increases the likelihood of interactions between disease-carrying wild primates and humans. The findings suggest the emergence and spread of viruses, such as the one that causes COVID-19, will become more common as the conversion of natural habitats into farmland continues worldwide.
3h ago sciencedaily.com
Genes sow seeds of neuropsychiatric diseases before birth, in early childhood
From early prenatal development through childhood, the prefrontal cortex of the human brain undergoes an avalanche of developmental activity. In some cases, it also contains seeds of neuropsychiatric illnesses such as autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia, according to a new genetic analysis.
3h ago sciencedaily.com
The pandemic has messed up global supply chains. Blockchains could help.
The novel coronavirus sweeping the globe has exposed how vulnerable international supply chains are to disruption. The World Economic Forum has a pitch for how to make them more resilient: blockchains. Covid-19 chaos: Quarantines, lockdowns, and reduced air travel have disrupted normal business operations all over the world and made it difficult for buyers to…
3h ago technologyreview.com
Researchers use big data to identify biodiversity hotspots
Often considered desolate, remote, unalterable places, the high seas are, in fact, hotbeds of activity for both people and wildlife. Technology has enabled more human activity in areas once difficult to reach, and that in turn has brought a growing presence of industries such as fishing, mining and transportation in international waters—the ocean beyond 200 nautical miles from any coast.
4h ago phys.org
NASA finds Tropical Cyclone Harold between Vanuatu and Fiji
Tropical Cyclone Harold brought heavy rains and hurricane-force winds to Vanuatu and was moving toward Fiji when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with an image of the storm.
4h ago phys.org
Evaluating embryos by detecting secreted proteins using microfluidic droplets and multicolor fluorescence
Infertility is estimated to affect 9% of reproductive-aged couples globally, and many couples consequently turn to assisted reproductive technology (ART). Selecting embryos with maximum development potential plays a pivotal role in obtaining the highest rate of success in ART treatment, which ultimately determines whether a couple gets pregnant.
4h ago phys.org
Making a connection: Two ways that fault segments may overcome their separation
In complex fault zones, multiple seemingly disconnected faults can potentially rupture at once, increasing the chance of a large damaging earthquake. Recent earthquakes including the 1992 Landers, 1999 Hector Mine and 2019 Ridgecrest earthquakes in California, among others, ruptured in this way. But how can seismologists predict whether individual fault segments might be connected and rupture together during a seismic event?
4h ago phys.org
The evolution of color: Team shows how butterfly wings can shift in hue
A selective mating experiment by a curious butterfly breeder has led scientists to a deeper understanding of how butterfly wing color is created and evolves. The study, led by scientists at University of California, Berkeley, and the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, is published today in eLife.
4h ago phys.org
Wild tomato resistance to bacterial canker has implications for commercial tomato industry
Bacterial canker of tomato is a disease that leads to wilt, cankers, and eventually death. The disease was first discovered in Grand Rapids, Michigan, in 1909, but annual outbreaks now affect tomato production areas worldwide. For some farmers, bacterial canker can be devastating and spoil an entire season's planting.
4h ago phys.org
Chemists 'program' liquid crystalline elastomers to replicate complex twisting action simply with the use of light
The twisting and bending capabilities of the human muscle system enable a varied and dynamic range of motion, from walking and running to reaching and grasping. Replicating something as seemingly simple as waving a hand in a robot, however, requires a complex series of motors, pumps, actuators and algorithms. Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh and Harvard University have recently designed a polymer known as a liquid crystal elastomer (LCE) that can be "programmed" to both twist and bend in the presence of light.
4h ago phys.org
Personalized microrobots swim through biological barriers, deliver drugs to cells
Tiny biohybrid robots on the micrometer scale can swim through the body and deliver drugs to tumors or provide other cargo-carrying functions. The natural environmental sensing tendencies of bacteria mean they can navigate toward certain chemicals or be remotely controlled using magnetic or sound signals.
4h ago phys.org
Disagreements help team perception, study finds
Team disagreements might be the key to helping soldiers identify objects in battle, researchers say. While studies on combat identification typically focus on how technology can help identify enemy forces, researchers sought to understand how teams work together to identify armored vehicles—using only their training and each other.
4h ago phys.org
NASA study adds a pinch of salt to El Niño models
When modeling the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) ocean-climate cycle, adding satellite sea surface salinity—or saltiness—data significantly improves model accuracy, according to a new NASA study.
4h ago phys.org
Magnetic monopoles detected in Kagome spin ice systems
Magnetic monopoles are actually impossible. At low temperatures, however, certain crystals can contain so-called quasi-particles that behave like magnetic monopoles. Now an international cooperation has proven that such monopoles also occur in a Kagome spin ice system.
5h ago sciencedaily.com
The evolution of color: How butterfly wings can shift in hue
A selective mating experiment by a curious butterfly breeder has led scientists to a deeper understanding of how butterfly wing color is created and evolves.
5h ago sciencedaily.com
What the COVID-19 Pandemic Means for Black Americans
The bias built into the health system means they will have worse outcomes on average if they get sick -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h ago blogs.scientificamerican.com
Protecting the high seas: Identify biodiversity hotspots
Researchers use big data to identify biodiversity hotspots that could become the first generation of high seas marine protected areas.
7h ago sciencedaily.com
Statement on chest imaging and COVID-19
A multinational consensus statement on the role of chest imaging in the management of patients with COVID-19 has just been published.
7h ago sciencedaily.com
How serotonin balances communication within the brain
Our brain is steadily engaged in soliloquies. These internal communications are usually also bombarded with external sensory events. Hence, the impact of the two neuronal processes need to be permanently fine-tuned to avoid their imbalance. A team of scientists has revealed the role of the neurotransmitter serotonin in this scenario. They discovered that distinct serotonergic receptor types control the gain of both streams of information in a separable manner.
7h ago sciencedaily.com
How wallflowers evolved a complementary pair of plant defenses
A pair of chemicals used by wallflowers and their kin to ward off predators have evolved to complement each other, with one targeting generalist herbivores and the other targeting specialized herbivores that have become resistant to the generalist defense.
7h ago sciencedaily.com
Researchers suggest a special diet against asthma
Can a special diet help in certain cases of asthma? A new study at least points to this conclusion. According to the study, mice that were switched to a so-called ketogenic diet showed significantly reduced inflammation of the respiratory tract.
7h ago sciencedaily.com
What type of cells does the novel coronavirus attack?
Scientists have examined samples from non-virus infected patients to determine which cells of the lungs and bronchi are targets for novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) infection.
7h ago sciencedaily.com
Simulations show extreme opinions can lead to polarized groups
Researchers use a theoretical model to examine what effect extreme views have on making the entire system more polarized. The group's network-based model extends a popular approach for studying opinion dynamics, called the Cobb model, and is based on the hypothesis that those with opinions farther from the middle of a political spectrum are also less influenced by others, a trait known to social scientists as 'rigidity of the extreme.'
7h ago sciencedaily.com
Adding a pinch of salt to El Niño models
When modeling the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) ocean-climate cycle, adding satellite sea surface salinity -- or saltiness -- data significantly improves model accuracy, according to a new study.
7h ago sciencedaily.com
First-ever photo proof of powerful jet emerging from colliding galaxies
Researchers have reported the first detection of a relativistic on-axis jet emerging from two colliding galaxies -- the first photographic proof that merging galaxies can produce jets of fast-moving charged particles. Scientists had previously discovered that jets could be found in elliptical-shaped galaxies, which can be formed in the merging of two spiral galaxies. Now, they have an image showing the formation of a jet from two younger, spiral-shaped galaxies.
7h ago sciencedaily.com
Bubble dynamics reveal how to empty bottles faster
Researchers have discovered how to make bottles empty faster, which has wide-ranging implications for many areas beyond the beverage industry. They explore this bottle-emptying phenomenon from the perspective of bubble dynamics on a commercial bottle by using high-speed photography. Image analysis allowed them to conceptualize various parameters, such as liquid film thickness, bubble aspect ratio, rise velocity and bottle emptying modes.
7h ago sciencedaily.com
Engineers and chemists 'program' liquid crystalline elastomers to replicate complex twisting action simply with the use of light
Researchers designed a polymer known as a liquid crystal elastomer (LCE) that can be 'programmed' to both twist and bend in the presence of light. Especially in the field of soft robotics, this is essential for building devices that exhibit controllable, dynamic behavior without the need for complex electronic components.
7h ago sciencedaily.com
Babies retain even detailed events during a nap
While sleeping the brain goes through previously experienced things, consolidates new memory contents and summarizes similar experiences into more general knowledge. This also applies to babies. However, they can more than just generalize what they have learned. A recent study shows: during sleep a baby's brain also consolidates the details of its individual experience and protects them from generalization and is therefore also important for what is known as episodic memory.
7h ago sciencedaily.com
Disagreements help team perception
Team disagreements might be the key to helping soldiers identify objects in battle, researchers say.
7h ago sciencedaily.com
Cancer scientists aim to use protein power to stop tumor growth
Scientists have created a new therapy option that may help halt tumor growth in certain cancers such as prostate, which is among the most common types of cancer in men.
7h ago sciencedaily.com
Common protein in skin can 'turn on' allergic itch
A commonly expressed protein in skin -- periostin -- can directly activate itch-associated neurons in the skin, according to new research. Blocking periostin receptors on these neurons reduced the itch response in a mouse model of atopic dermatitis, or eczema.
7h ago sciencedaily.com
Personalized microrobots swim through biological barriers, deliver drugs to cells
Biohybrid robots on the micrometer scale can swim through the body and deliver drugs to tumors or provide other cargo-carrying functions. To be successful, they must consist of materials that can pass through the body's immune response, swim quickly through viscous environments and penetrate tissue cells to deliver cargo. Researchers fabricated biohybrid bacterial microswimmers by combining a genetically engineered E. coli MG1655 substrain and nanoerythrosomes, small structures made from red blood cells.
7h ago sciencedaily.com
How to Stop Science Thieves
Universities are creating new tools to guard research against threats to national security and competitiveness -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h ago blogs.scientificamerican.com
New Coronavirus Drug Shows Promise in Animal Tests
Slated for human trials, EIDD-2801 could become the first pill for COVID-19 -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h ago scientificamerican.com
Harnessing Social Media for the COVID-19 Pandemic
Campaigns such as #See10Do10 can make a sometimes frivolous way of communicating socially useful -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h ago blogs.scientificamerican.com
New Coronavirus Drug Shows Promise in Animal Tests
Slated for human trials, EIDD-2801 could become the first pill for COVID-19 -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h ago scientificamerican.com
Researcher discovers early, complex brain surgery in ancient Greece
New research from Adelphi University has revealed the first forensically-assessed archeological discovery of remains of a group of domineering mounted archer-lancers and their kin of the Eastern Roman Empire from the turbulent ProtoByzantine period, which spanned the fourth to seventh centuries.
7h ago phys.org
As CO2 Emissions Drop During Pandemic, Methane May Rise
With oil revenues down, companies may not prioritize fixing leaks and could vent more unwanted gas -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h ago scientificamerican.com
First-ever photo proof of powerful jet emerging from colliding galaxies
A team of Clemson University College of Science researchers, in collaboration with international colleagues, has reported the first definitive detection of a relativistic jet emerging from two colliding galaxies—in essence, the first photographic proof that merging galaxies can produce jets of charged particles that travel at nearly the speed of light.
8h ago phys.org
Marketing researchers identify the three most powerful drivers of effective crowdfunding
While the concept of crowdfunding is still in its early phases of development, a group of marketing researchers have conducted a study that reveals the most powerful drivers behind effective crowdfunding campaigns. According to the researchers, there are three primary mechanisms that serve as the major drivers of crowdfunding campaigns that yield results.
8h ago phys.org
Atomic force microscopy reveals high heterogeneity in bacterial membrane vesicles
One aspect of bacterial activity is the production of so-called extracellular membrane vesicles (MVs): biological 'packages' wrapped in a lipid-bilayer membrane, carrying for example genetic material. Apart from having specific biological functions, MVs are increasingly used in nanobiotechnological applications, including drug delivery and enzyme transport. In order to better understand the processes involving MVs, a full apprehension of their physical properties is essential. In particular, the degree of heterogeneity of vesicles released by one single type of bacterium is an important point. Now, Azuma Taoka from Kanazawa University, Nobuhiko Nomura from Tsukuba University and colleagues have addressed this question, and demonstrate a previously unrecognized physical heterogeneity in the membrane vesicles of four types of bacterium.
8h ago phys.org
How wallflowers evolved a complementary pair of plant defenses
A pair of chemicals used by wallflowers and their kin to ward off predators have evolved to complement each other, with one targeting generalist herbivores and the other targeting specialised herbivores that have become resistant to the generalist defence.
8h ago phys.org
Better plant edits by enhancing DNA repair
A new genome editing system enhances the efficiency of an error-free DNA repair pathway, which could help improve agronomic traits in multiple crops.
8h ago phys.org
Distinct processing of lncRNAs contributes to non-conserved functions in stem cells
Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), which are longer than 200 nucleotides in length and lack protein coding potential, are pervasively transcribed in eukaryotic genomes. It is well established that lncRNAs play important roles in gene expression in diverse cellular and biological progress.
8h ago phys.org
Air quality and health impact from the 2018 Saddleworth Moor Fire in Northern England
In June 2018, large wildfires broke out on Saddleworth Moor and Winter Hill Saddleworth Moor in the northwest of England. The fires burned for roughly three weeks, 100 firefighters and the army attended and smoke from the fires spread widely across the northwest of England.
8h ago phys.org
Something is lurking in the heart of Quasar 3C 279
One year ago, the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) Collaboration published the first image of a black hole in the nearby radio galaxy M 87. Now the collaboration has extracted new information from the EHT data on the distant quasar 3C 279: they observed the finest detail ever seen in a jet produced by a supermassive black hole. New analyses, led by Jae-Young Kim from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy (MPIfR) in Bonn, enabled the collaboration to trace the jet back to its launch point, close to where violently variable radiation from across the electromagnetic spectrum arises.
8h ago phys.org
Prototype uses light to gauge composition, density of subsoils
On the surface, it resembles a stainless steel spear, roughly 6 feet long with a silver-dollar diameter that ends in a 30-degree point.
8h ago phys.org
Building a bean that resists leafhoppers
Leafhoppers are tiny insects. They are only about 3 millimeters long, smaller than a grain of rice. But they can cause big damage to crops, including beans.
8h ago phys.org
Researchers quantify ecosystem-scale nitrification rate
Human-caused increases in gaseous nitrogen (N) emissions to the atmosphere have accelerated terrestrial ecosystem N deposition over the past half-century. As forest productivity is usually N limited, accelerated N deposition can promote the growth of forest trees. But long-term excessive N input may negatively affect forest ecosystems, leading to soil acidification nutrient loss, plant nutrient imbalance, greenhouse gas emissions increase and biodiversity loss.
8h ago phys.org
A new method to correct systematic errors in ocean subsurface data
A homogeneous, consistent, high-quality in situ temperature dataset covering a period of decades is crucial for the detection of climate changes in the ocean.
8h ago phys.org
Researchers investigate the structure of phosphate ionic conducting glasses using solid-state NMR
Glassy fast ionic conductors can be used as solid electrolytes, cathode materials, conducting fibers and electrochromic glasses due to their high ionic conductivity and good transparency. While the conductivity of the conductors is highly dependent on the organization of glass networks, it is very difficult to finely characterize the glass structure, and thus the relation between the conductivity and glass structures has rarely been reported. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is extremely suitable for probing glass structures due to its flexible and comprehensive capabilities in detecting the structure information of vitreous materials at the atomic scale.
8h ago phys.org
AI system that predicts movement of glass molecules transitioning between liquid and solid states
A team of researchers at Google's DeepMind has developed an AI system that is able to predict the movement of glass molecules as the material transitions between liquid and solid states. They have published a paper outlining their work on the DeepMind website.
8h ago phys.org
Aquatic ancestors of terrestrial millipedes characterized for the first time
Insects, spiders and millipedes make up the majority of all animals on land. While today not many of them live in the water, their ancestors were once aquatic.
8h ago phys.org
Bubble dynamics reveal how to empty bottles faster
Bottle emptying is a phenomenon most of us have observed while pouring a beverage. Researchers from the Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee discovered how to make bottles empty faster, which has wide-ranging implications for many areas beyond the beverage industry.
9h ago phys.org
Simulations show extreme opinions can lead to polarized groups
In recent years, chaos theory and other forms of computational modeling have sought to leverage findings in the social sciences to better describe—and maybe one day predict—how groups of people behave. One approach looks to update a widely used model to examine how changes in political opinions ripple through a group and how polarization can arise.
9h ago phys.org
Yes, Liquor Stores Are Essential Businesses
Keeping them open can help people with alcohol use disorder avoid withdrawal symptoms, including tremors, hallucinations and seizures -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h ago blogs.scientificamerican.com
Are gamma-ray bursts powered by a star's collapsing magnetic fields?
When a massive star in a distant galaxy collapses, forming a black hole, two giant jets of light-emitting plasma shoot from its core. These extremely bright gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most powerful explosions in the universe, and when a jet points towards Earth, the afterglow can be detected from ground and space-borne telescopes. Material does not simply catapult from an exploding star, it accelerates to ultra-high speeds along the narrow beam of the gamma-ray jet, leaving astrophysics puzzled over the power source driving these extraordinary explosions. Now a new international study led by the University of Bath promises to shed light on this mysterious phenomenon.
9h ago phys.org
A 'mobilize and transition' strategy could reduce Covid-19 mortality while cushioning the economic decline
While the human toll of the COVID-19 pandemic has been apparent for some time, the economic picture is now starting to come into greater focus. Initial unemployment claims in the United States jumped from 280,000 to almost 3.3 million for the week ending March 21, then doubled to over 6.6 million for the following week. By way of comparison, weekly unemployment claims have never previously exceeded 700,000 in the history of the recorded data. The S&P 500 Index reached a record high in mid-February, then lost a third of its value in a month. Congress passed a $2 trillion stimulus bill on March 27, one quarter of which allows for loans and grants to firms under the discretion of the Secretary of the Treasury. And the Federal Reserve invoked the "unusual and exigent circumstances" clause of Section 13(3) of the Federal Reserve Act to break out of its usual shackles and channel credit to (non-bank) firms, states, and municipalities.
9h ago phys.org
Innovative technologies for satellites
Some satellites are only slightly larger than a milk carton. This type of construction is now to be given a further simplified architecture and thus become even lighter and more cost-effective: This is the goal of the teams of Professors Sergio Montenegro of the University of Würzburg and Enrico Stoll of the Technical University of Braunschweig, both in Germany.
9h ago phys.org
Lymphoma's different route revealed
Researchers observe the very early stages of blood vessel development in lymph node tumors. The findings suggest a potential treatment target to slow lymphoma tumor growth.
9h ago sciencedaily.com
Are gamma-ray bursts powered by a star's collapsing magnetic fields?
In its final moments of life, a distant massive star releases an intense burst of high-energy gamma radiation - a Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) - the brightest sources of energy in the universe, detectable to humans through powerful telescopes. Scientists have long been divided over what powers these extraordinary explosions. Now research suggests a dying star's collapsing magnetic field may hold the answers.
9h ago sciencedaily.com
How the Cold War is helping the biggest fish in the sea
It might surprise you to learn that nuclear bomb tests during the Cold War are now helping conserve whale sharks, the largest living fish.
9h ago phys.org
Why coronavirus impacts are devastating for international students in private rental housing
About half of international students in Australia are private renters and more than half of them rely on paid work to pay the rent, but most of the casual jobs they depend on have been lost in the coronavirus pandemic. The results of our recent survey (conducted pre-COVID-19) of international students living in private rental accommodation suggest up to half of them may now be unable to pay their rent. Many also live in quite crowded conditions, so will struggle to self-isolate even if they don't lose their current housing.
9h ago phys.org
Astronomers Battle Space Explorers for Access to Moon's Far Side
Without protection from radio interference, a giant observatory on the moon’s hidden hemisphere could prove unworkable -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h ago scientificamerican.com
Why the coronavirus lockdown is making the internet stronger than ever
Just like that, our internet connection has become an umbilical to the outside world. We now depend on it to do our jobs, to go to school, and to see other people. It is our primary source of entertainment. And we’re using it a lot. Between January and late March, internet traffic increased by around…
9h ago technologyreview.com
Scientists develop new way to identify the sex of sea turtle hatchlings
Unlike humans, sea turtles and other reptiles like crocodiles do not have sex chromosomes. Their sex is defined during development by the incubation environment. In sea turtles, sex is determined by the nest's temperature: warmer temperatures produce females and cooler temperatures produce males. It is especially challenging to identify the sex of hatchling sea turtles because they lack external sexual organs and heteromorphic sex chromosomes—no X or Y. To date, there are a limited number of ways to reliably identify sex in turtle hatchlings. With the rapid increase of global temperatures, there is an urgent need to clearly assess sex ratios in these imperiled animals.
9h ago phys.org
Applying CRISPR beyond Arabidopsis thaliana
Few technologies have made as big a splash in recent years as CRISPR/Cas9, and rightfully so. CRISPR/Cas9, or clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and associated genes, is a bacterial gene editing toolbox that allows researchers to edit genomic sequences much more precisely and efficiently than previously possible, opening up doors to new ways of doing research. As with many new biotechnologies, the application of CRISPR in biology began with genetic model organisms such as Arabidopsis thaliana. In research presented in a recent issue of Applications in Plant Sciences, Shengchen Shan and colleagues review the prospects for expanding the use of CRISPR for research beyond genetic model plant species.
9h ago phys.org
Climate change triggers Great Barrier Reef bleaching
The Great Barrier Reef is suffering through its worst bleaching event. This is the third bleaching within the space of five years.
9h ago sciencedaily.com
New practices improve stroke care
A new method of evaluating and prioritizing treatment for patients with suspected acute stroke, which has been used by the Stockholm health authority since 2017, has led to faster health interventions and better patient care, shows a new study.
10h ago sciencedaily.com
Coronavirus is not the 'great equalizer'—race matters
One of the first stories to use race-based data to talk about the risk that Black communities face because of COVID-19 came on March 30 from the Charlotte Observer. The article said Black residents in Mecklenburg County, in Charlotte, N.C., accounted for 43.9 percent of the 303 confirmed COVID-19 cases locally, but Black residents make up only 32.9 percent of the county's population.
10h ago phys.org
Researchers reveal new understandings of synthetic gene circuits
Recent discoveries by two research teams in the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering at Arizona State University are advancing the field of synthetic biology.
10h ago phys.org
Here's how scientists are tracking the genetic evolution of COVID-19
When you hear the term "evolutionary tree," you may think of Charles Darwin and the study of the relationships between different species over the span of millions of years.
10h ago phys.org
Public participation in the coronavirus age
Americans of all walks of life are working together to slow the spread of COVID-19 by practicing social distancing. Public agencies are doing their part by closing offices to the public, canceling or postponing hearings, and shifting services and proceedings to virtual formats. In this post we look at the role of open meetings laws in providing for transparent proceedings, and suggest a set of best practices for ensuring that state environmental agencies, public utility commissions, and local governments cultivate meaningful public participation while weathering this pandemic.
10h ago phys.org
Climate-smart agricultural policy requires reformed incentives to minimize emissions
Post-2020 Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) must safeguard and stimulate the preservation of carbon-rich soils through protection of peatlands. Functional peatlands are the most space efficient long-term carbon store and sink in our planet's biosphere.
10h ago phys.org
Drinking water study shows beef cattle can tolerate high levels of sulphates
Scientists at the University of Saskatchewan (USask) have published a study that shows beef cattle can tolerate higher concentrations of sulphates in drinking water than previously believed.
10h ago phys.org
Antibiotic matter waves: The quantum wave nature of a complex antibiotic polypeptide
One of the central tenets of quantum mechanics is the wave-particle duality. It tells us that even massive objects behave like both particles and waves. A number of previous experiments have shown this for electrons, neutrons, atoms and even large molecules. Quantum theory maintains that this is a universal property of matter. However, it had been notoriously difficult to extend this research to complex biomolecular systems. New experiments at the University of Vienna, supported by quantum chemical modeling at Stanford University, now demonstrate for the first time the quantum wave nature of a complex antibiotic polypeptide, here gramicidin. The results have been published in Nature Communications.
10h ago phys.org
Transforming wastewater byproducts into sustainable green fuels
A huge quantity of organic waste from various sectors either ends up in landfills or gets incinerated, further increasing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and soil and water pollution. To address this issue, it's crucial to develop and implement a proper waste management plan.
10h ago phys.org
When Maxwell's demon takes its time: Measuring microparticle reaction time
Researchers at the Universities Vienna and Stuttgart have investigated a version of Maxwell's demon embodied by a delayed feedback force acting on a levitated microparticle. They confirmed new fundamental limits that time delay imposes on the demon's actions which are not covered by the standard laws of thermodynamics. The team of scientists published their new study in the journal Nature Communications.
10h ago phys.org
Why the coronavirus lockdown is making the internet better than ever
Far from breaking it, the surge in usage the internet is seeing right now is driving a major upgrade.
10h ago technologyreview.com
Repetitive irradiation with 222nm UVC non-carcinogenic, safe for sterilizing human skin
Joint research between Kobe University and Ushio Inc. has provided proof for the first time in the world that direct and repetitive illumination from 222-nm ultraviolet radiation C (UVC), which is a powerful sterilizer, does not cause skin cancer. This suggests that 222-nm UVC is also safe for human eyes and skin. This technology is expected to have a wide range of antibacterial and antiviral applications in medical facilities and daily life.
10h ago phys.org
Shell puzzle: An additional piece added to the evolution of turtles
The origin of turtles is among the most debated topics in evolutionary biology. In a recently published study in the journal Nature Scientific Reports, Senckenberg scientist Ingmar Werneburg, in cooperation with an international research team, refutes existing hypotheses and sheds a new light on the evolution of the skull architecture. The results indicate a close link between skull evolution and the highly flexible neck of these armored reptiles.
10h ago phys.org
New method to monitor Alzheimer's proteins
Physicists at the Center for Integrated Nanostructure Physics (CINAP), within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea), have reported a new method to identify the aggregation state of amyloid beta (Aβ) proteins in solution. Published in ACS Nano, this finding could represent a step forward in the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.
10h ago phys.org
Bending microwaves and forbidding frequencies with simulated metamaterials
Using plasma to control microwaves for beaming direct energy toward a specific point is explored for their durability in high-energy electric fields and their reconfigurable structure. High power microwave beams, similar to lasers, can transmit energy at high speeds over long distances, unaffected by wind, gravity, or other forces. Aerospace engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign simulated a metamaterial formed from plasma structures to demonstrate its potential to tune microwave frequencies.
10h ago phys.org
Blood plasma taken from covid-19 survivors might help patients fight it off
A small study from China suggests transfusions of blood from those who have beaten the disease could help buy time for new victims
10h ago technologyreview.com
How to foster children's learning while sheltering at home
Parents sheltering at home with their kids sometimes struggle to foster their children's continued engagement with learning. Eva Pomerantz, a professor of psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, studies the factors that promote children's motivation and achievement at school. She spoke to News Bureau life sciences editor Diana Yates about her research on the topic and her own efforts to keep her children academically engaged while at home.
10h ago phys.org
Researchers discover new method to generate nanobubbles in water
Researchers at University College Dublin (UCD) have discovered a new energy-efficient method to generate and release substantial volumes of metastable, nano-scale gas bubbles in water, in excess of natural solubility levels. The discovery has the potential to disrupt a number of industries including; wastewater treatment, gas storage, food, bio-pharma and brewing.
10h ago phys.org
Secure light-based communication through biological tissues
Visible light communications (VLC), and optical communications overall, caught professor Marcos Katz's interest when he and his team first demonstrated in 2017 a reconfigurable hybrid wireless network exploiting VLC and radio technologies. The network seamlessly switched from radio to optical, or vice versa, according to the condition of the channels, context information, local policies and others.
10h ago phys.org
Physicists produce stable water-based graphene dispersions
Umeå researchers show how activated graphene, activated carbons and other hydrophobic carbons can be dispersed in water in a form of micrometer-sized particles. The key agent that helps to make these dispersions last for days is the oxidized form of graphene named graphene oxide. The authors have applied for patent for the method to prepare dispersions.
10h ago phys.org
Scientists develop new way to identify the sex of sea turtle hatchlings
A new minimally invasive technique greatly enhances the ability to measure neonate turtle sex ratios. This is the first time that differences in sex-specific protein expression patterns have been identified in blood samples of hatchlings with temperature-dependent sex determination. The technique is a crucial step in assessing the impact of climate change on imperiled turtle species and will enable more accurate estimates of hatchling sex ratios at a population level and on a global scale.
10h ago sciencedaily.com
Ensure migrant, refugees' rights during coronavirus outbreak, says expert
As borders close around the world in response to the novel coronavirus outbreak, and as increased nativism and fear provide fodder for anti-migrant and refugee agendas, there is a heightened imperative to ensure the rights of those who are unable to return to their home countries, according to an expert at Rice's Baker Institute for Public Policy.
10h ago phys.org
Here are the states that will have the worst hospital bed shortages
We all know by now that flattening the curve is one of the most important things we can do to mitigate the devastation of the coronavirus pandemic. China and Italy provided a grim picture of what happens when you’re unsuccessful: overwhelmed hospitals are forced to choose which patients receive life-saving resources, overworked doctors are more…
10h ago technologyreview.com
COVID-19 exposes inequalities in the UK food system, new analysis reveals
Food banks will struggle to cope during the COVID-19 pandemic and vulnerable households should be given cash grants to buy food instead, a group of leading academics have suggested.
10h ago phys.org
How to teach high-school and college students about coronavirus
Here are some questions you might not have heard answered about the coronavirus and the disease it causes, COVID-19, in the media:
10h ago phys.org
Soil scientists help law enforcement find answers in crime scenes
We have seen them on TV, the crime scene investigators who sift through the minutiae such as soil to help law enforcement personnel determine what took place.
10h ago phys.org
Coronavirus effects hurting elementary students and recent graduates, expert says
With 10,000,000 Americans filing unemployment claims and the coronavirus outbreak forcing longer stay-at-home orders, college graduates have more to worry about than missing their commencement ceremonies. Younger students who rely on resources provided by their teachers and schools are suddenly out of school for several months. Where will this leave the class of 2020 as they hunt for jobs and the generations behind them?
10h ago phys.org
Here are the states that will suffer the worst hospital bed shortages
Every state’s health-care capacity will have an outsize impact on covid-19 deaths.
11h ago technologyreview.com
How has COVID-19 impacted supply chains around the world?
Acute shortages of supplies to safely diagnose and treat patients with COVID-19 has crippled the United States' response to the coronavirus pandemic. Despite the importance of widespread and comprehensive testing for COVID-19, a joint statement issued two weeks ago by state health authorities and public health laboratories warned of a "widescale shortage of laboratory supplies and reagents" and urged health professionals to limit testing "until sufficient testing supplies and capacity become more widely available."
11h ago phys.org
Radio Corona, Apr 7: Nelson Mark on covid-19 and the economy
In this episode of Radio Corona on April 7 at 4 pm ET, Gideon Lichfield, editor in chief of MIT Technology Review, speaks with Nelson Mark, economics professor at the University of Notre Dame, about the economic impact of covid-19, how we should think about pandemics as economic risks, and how the US should be…
11h ago technologyreview.com
Radio Corona, Apr 7: Nelson Mark on covid-19 and the economy
11h ago technologyreview.com
WhatsApp is limiting message forwarding to combat coronavirus misinformation
The news: WhatsApp has said it will implement new limits on message forwarding amid growing concerns that it is being used to spread misinformation about the coronavirus pandemic. From today, messages identified as “highly forwarded” can be forwarded to only a single person as opposed to five, the company, which is owned by Facebook, said in a…
11h ago technologyreview.com
Risk of E. coli in hydroponic and aquaponic systems may be greater than once thought
A spate of foodborne illnesses in leafy greens and other produce in recent years has sickened consumers and disrupted growers and supply chains. It's been thought that hydroponic and aquaponic systems could reduce these issues since there is little opportunity for pathogens like E. coli to contaminate the edible parts of plants.
11h ago phys.org
X-ray source 3XMM J000511.8+634018 is a polar, study suggests
Astronomers from Germany and France have investigated a newly discovered variable X-ray source known as 3XMM J000511.8+634018. Results of the new study suggest that the source is a polar. The finding is detailed in a paper published March 30 on the arXiv pre-print server.
11h ago phys.org
The Pandemic Shows Why America Must Invest in Public Research
This moment of crisis calls for the United States to rediscover its powers of discovery -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h ago blogs.scientificamerican.com
The Pandemic Shows Why the U.S. Must Invest in Public Research
This moment of crisis calls for the nation to rediscover its powers of discovery -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h ago blogs.scientificamerican.com
COVID-19 highlights the importance of agility for supply chains
The recent COVID-19 crisis has highlighted a fundamental concept in business operations strategy that's called "Triple-A Supply Chains." The idea is about 15 years old, and many people outside of the supply chain world are probably unfamiliar with it, but it has never felt more relevant.
11h ago phys.org
How soil microbes help plants resist disease
Plants can't self-isolate during a disease outbreak, but they can get help from a friend—beneficial soil microbes help plants ward off a wide range of diseases. Now, Texas A&M AgriLife scientists have uncovered a major part of the process in which beneficial fungi help corn plants defend against pathogens.
11h ago phys.org
COVID-19 lockdown: Home is 'the most dangerous place' for women and children
As the UK engages in another week of "lockdown," and as a way of understanding and mitigating some of the effects of COVID-19, commentators are increasingly focused on what the unintended consequences of this change in social behavior might be. The potential increase in violence against women and children is one such consequence. Last week alone, there were nine reported deaths attributed to the 'stay at home' policy.
11h ago phys.org
Meat Pills Fight Tuberculosis
Originally published in June 1868 -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h ago scientificamerican.com
Tiny polymer springs give a boost to environmental cleanup
A study from Sujit Datta's lab, led by graduate student Christopher Browne, found that a promising class of cleaning solutions behave in ways that both confound traditional fluid models and explain their usefulness to remediation efforts. Published March 2 in the Journal of Fluid Mechanics, the paper helps solve a decades-old puzzle about why these cleaners only work in some conditions.
11h ago phys.org
Bushfires damaged Australian rainforest that is home to Earth's only living specimens of ancient species
Recent wildfires in Australia torched more than 48,000 square miles of land (for context, Pennsylvania is about 46,000 square miles). The fires impacted ecologically sensitive regions, including an area called the Gondwana Rainforests of Australia World Heritage Site. This region contains a vast concentration of living plants with fossil records from tens of millions of years ago, according to Peter Wilf.
11h ago phys.org
To curb sexual assault, help people better understand consent
Sexual assault is a persistent problem on college campuses. Women are at greater risk of experiencing sexual assault while in college compared to women in the general population, with about a quarter of all undergraduate women in the U.S. estimated to experience sexual assault by their senior year.
11h ago phys.org
Latino, Asian American areas at high economic risk, according to new report
Neighborhoods with significant Latino and Asian American populations in Los Angeles County are particularly vulnerable to economic uncertainty during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new report sponsored by the Latino Policy and Politics Initiative (LPPI) and Center for Neighborhood Knowledge (CNK) at UCLA Luskin, along with Ong & Associates.
11h ago phys.org
Mochizuki's inter-universal Teichmüller proof has been published (Update)
After eight years of debate, Japanese mathematician Shinichi Mochizuki has found a publisher for his mammoth undertaking—the inter-universal Teichmüller theory (IUT). As part of the 600-page proof, Mochizuki claims that he has solved the abc conjecture. The proof appears in Publications of the Research Institute for Mathematical Sciences—Mochizuki is editor in chief there.
11h ago phys.org
Why Do White Men and Scientists Tend to Downplay the Risks of Technology?
The naive answer is that white men and scientists are coldly rational—but that’s not the whole story -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h ago scientificamerican.com
Why bad smells stick around and how to eliminate them
Ever wondered why something smells the way it does—good or bad—and why some odors just hang around no matter what you do to get rid of them?
12h ago phys.org
Belle II yields the first results: In search of the Z′ boson
The Belle II experiment has been collecting data from physical measurements for about one year. After several years of rebuilding work, both the SuperKEKB electron–positron accelerator and the Belle II detector have been improved compared with their predecessors in order to achieve a 40-fold higher data rate.
12h ago phys.org
Research unearths the science behind the smell of spring
You may not have heard of geosmin but, wherever you may be on this planet, it is highly likely that you'd recognise its smell.
12h ago phys.org
Unusual ozone hole opens over the Arctic
Scientists using data from the Copernicus Sentinel-5P satellite have noticed a strong reduction of ozone concentrations over the Arctic. Unusual atmospheric conditions, including freezing temperatures in the stratosphere, have led ozone levels to plummet—causing a 'mini-hole' in the ozone layer.
12h ago phys.org
DNA Lego bricks enable fast rewritable data storage
DNA data storage may become easier to read and write than before, according to researchers at the University of Cambridge Cavendish Laboratory in the U.K. They report on a technique that can also store encrypted data, as well as re-write data.
12h ago phys.org
Bethe strings experimentally observed
Ninety years ago, the physicist Hans Bethe postulated that unusual patterns, so-called Bethe strings, appear in certain magnetic solids. Now, an international team has succeeded in experimentally detecting such Bethe strings for the first time. They used neutron scattering experiments at various neutron facilities, including the unique high-field magnet of BER II at HZB. The experimental data are in excellent agreement with the theoretical prediction of Bethe, and prove once again the power of quantum physics.
12h ago phys.org
New genetic tools expand capacity to investigate microbes
A team of international scientists has developed a suite of more than 200 new genetic techniques for using marine microbes to investigate a host of questions in biology. The new tools are an essential step forward in understanding the cellular instructions that underpin microbial life in the sea.
12h ago sciencedaily.com
Litter problem at England's protected coasts
Beaches in or near England's Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) have the same levels of litter as those in unprotected areas, new research shows.
12h ago sciencedaily.com