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Summer of Blob: Maine sees more big, stinging jellyfish
Seaside New England is known for rocky shores, seafood shacks, chance whale sightings and, in recent months, lots of gooey, tentacled blobs.
1m ago phys.org
Antibiotic resistance surges in dolphins, mirroring humans
Antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest public health challenges in the world today since many common bacterial infections are developing resistance to the drugs once used to treat them, and new antibiotics aren't being developed fast enough to combat the problem.
2m ago phys.org
A coordinated drone attack has knocked out half of Saudi Arabia’s oil supply
1h ago technologyreview.com
Is Mathematics, Like Science, Pluralistic?
Mathematicians disagree over whether their fundamental assumptions, or axioms, are true. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h ago blogs.scientificamerican.com
New Proto-Dinosaur Found in Colorado
A lanky reptile found in the Centennial State is a close cousin of early dinosaurs -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h ago blogs.scientificamerican.com
Did the Dinosaur-Killing Asteroid Inadvertently Help Lichens?
The leafy lichens seem to have picked up where a lot of incinerated plants left off -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h ago blogs.scientificamerican.com
Frontline fight: Indonesia locked in epic battle against jungle blazes
Working around the clock, thousands of firefighters are struggling to contain smog-belching blazes raging across rainforests and farmland in Indonesia, one of the frontlines against fires blamed for aggravating global warming.
7h ago phys.org
Indonesia seals off 30 companies over forest fires
Indonesia has sealed off 30 companies amid a row with Malaysia over forest fires that are spreading a thick, noxious haze around Southeast Asia, officials said Saturday.
7h ago phys.org
Tropical Storm Humberto dumps rain on hurricane-hit Bahamas
Tropical Storm Humberto lashed the Bahamas with rain and wind on Saturday, possibly slowing down relief efforts in the wake of the devastation wrought less than two weeks ago by Hurricane Dorian.
8h ago phys.org
Ohio senators propose renaming NASA site for Neil Armstrong
Ohio's U.S. senators want Congress to rename a NASA research facility in Ohio after astronaut Neil Armstrong.
8h ago phys.org
Pluralism: Beyond the One and Only Truth
Some big questions, such as how matter makes mind and what quantum mechanics means, may not have a single, definitive answer -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d ago blogs.scientificamerican.com
The Atmospheric Microbiome
For single-celled organisms Earth's atmosphere represents transport, refuge, and possibly a habitat -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d ago blogs.scientificamerican.com
Readers Respond to the May 2019 Issue
Letters to the editor from the May 2019 issue of Scientific American -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d ago scientificamerican.com
Farmers, chefs fight to save classic ingredients in Mexican cuisine
Speaking against a backdrop of two soaring, snow-capped volcanoes, Asuncion Diaz explains his fight to save the original poblano chile, one of the most important ingredients in Mexican cuisine, from climate change and other threats.
1d ago phys.org
Legal respite only temporary as Amazon indigenous battle miners
The Amazon's Amahuaca people braved marauding rubber tappers a century ago, and now face a new threat to their survival as gold mines and oil wells increasingly encircle their jungle home.
1d ago phys.org
Protests against German car industry rev up in Frankfurt (Update)
Thousands of protesters, many on bicycles, gathered in the southern German city of Frankfurt Saturday to protest outside the city's motor show, part of a new wave of environmental activism.
1d ago phys.org
Water or Gold? Eternal question nags Ecuador tribes
The indigenous people of Ecuador's wind-whipped alpine tundra of Quimsacocha face a stark choice, according to their leader, Yaku Perez.
1d ago phys.org
Tropical Storm Humberto targets hurricane-hit Bahamas
The devastated northern Bahama islands were facing a fresh tropical storm on Saturday, potentially complicating desperately needed relief efforts to the shattered archipelago in the wake of Hurricane Dorian.
1d ago phys.org
New way to target cancer's diversity and evolution
Scientists have revealed close-up details of a vital molecule involved in the mix and match of genetic information within cells -- opening up the potential to target proteins of this family to combat cancer's diversity and evolution.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Predicting risk of heart failure for diabetes patients with help from machine learning
A new study unveils a new, machine-learning derived model that can predict, with a high degree of accuracy, future heart failure among patients with diabetes.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
New vibration sensor detects buried objects from moving vehicle
Researchers will report a new laser-based sensor that effectively detects buried objects even while the detector is in motion. This new device offers a significant improvement over existing technologies, which cannot be operated on the go and lose accuracy in the presence of external sources of sound or vibration.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
How microtubules branch in new directions, a first look in animals
Cell biologists say they have, for the first time, directly observed and recorded in animal cells a pathway called branching microtubule nucleation, a mechanism in cell division that had been imaged in cellular extracts and plant cells but not directly observed in animal cells.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Ancient Australia was home to strange marsupial giants, some weighing over 1,000 kg
Palorchestid marsupials, an extinct group of Australian megafauna, had strange bodies and lifestyles unlike any living species.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Death toll from Spain floods rises to five
Three more people died as torrential rain and flash floods battered southeastern Spain, raising the death toll to five with the rising waters causing havoc for travellers and forcing 3,500 people from their homes, officials said Friday.
1d ago phys.org
New vibration sensor detects buried objects from moving vehicle
Detecting landmines can be a challenging and slow process. Detecting them from a moving vehicle would make the process more speedy, but at the expense of accuracy.
1d ago phys.org
Microbes make chemicals for scent marking in a cat
Domestic cats, like many other mammals, use smelly secretions from anal sacs to mark territory and communicate with other animals. A new study from the Genome Center at the University of California, Davis shows that many odiferous compounds from a male cat are actually made not by the cat, but by a community of bacteria living in the anal sacs. The work is published Sept. 13 in PLOS ONE.
1d ago phys.org
Ancient Australia was home to strange marsupial giants, some weighing over 1,000 kg
Palorchestid marsupials, an extinct group of Australian megafauna, had strange bodies and lifestyles unlike any living species, according to a study released September 13, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Hazel Richards of Monash University, Australia and colleagues.
1d ago phys.org
Gemini observatory captures multicolor image of first-ever interstellar comet
The first-ever comet from beyond our Solar System has been successfully imaged by the Gemini Observatory in multiple colors. The image of the newly discovered object, denoted C/2019 Q4 (Borisov), was obtained on the night of 9-10 September using the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph on the Gemini North Telescope on Hawaii's Maunakea.
1d ago phys.org
Scientists sharpen gene editing tool
Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine scientists have fine-tuned their delivery system to deliver a DNA editing tool to alter DNA sequences and modify gene function. The improved "hit and run" system works faster and is more efficient.
1d ago phys.org
NASA-NOAA satellite's night-time look at Tropical Storm Kiko
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean in the early hours of Sept. 12 and grabbed a nighttime look at Tropical Storm Kiko.
1d ago phys.org
GPM analyzes rainfall in Bahamas from potential Tropical Cyclone 9
As the Bahamas continue to recover from Category 5 hurricane Dorian, a new developing tropical cyclone is bringing additional rainfall to an already soaked area.
1d ago phys.org
Undergraduate engineers advance shock wave mitigation research
A team of undergraduate engineers at UC San Diego has discovered a method that could make materials more resilient against massive shocks such as earthquakes or explosions. The students, conducting research in the structural engineering lab of Professor Veronica Eliasson, used a shock tube to generate powerful explosions within the tube—at Mach 1.2 to be exact, meaning faster than the speed of sound. They then used an ultra high-speed camera to capture and analyze how materials with certain patterns fared.
1d ago phys.org
How microtubules branch in new directions, a first look in animals
Cell biologist Thomas Maresca and senior research fellow Vikash Verma at the University of Massachusetts Amherst say they have, for the first time, directly observed and recorded in animal cells a pathway called branching microtubule nucleation, a mechanism in cell division that had been imaged in cellular extracts and plant cells but not directly observed in animal cells. Details appear this month in the Journal of Cell Biology.
1d ago phys.org
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP tracks fire and smoke from two continents
Wherever fires are burning around the world NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite's Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) can track the smoke and aerosols. On Sept. 13, 2019, data from OMPS revealed aerosols and smoke from fires over both South America and North America.
1d ago phys.org
Gene editing tool gets sharpened by WFIRM team
Scientists have fine-tuned their delivery system to deliver a DNA editing tool to alter DNA sequences and modify gene function. The improved 'hit and run' system works faster and is more efficient.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
How IL-6 allows the immune response to develop for a key cell, the T follicular helper
A preclinical study shows how the interplay of two interleukin signaling proteins, IL-6 and IL-2, affects the development of T follicular helper cells and germinal centers. This interplay may either maintain or disrupt the balancing act of the immune system between attacking infections and benign surveillance of the body's own cells. Thus, the research may help guide future disease treatment for autoimmune diseases like lupus.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Paramagnetic spins take electrons for a ride, produce electricity from heat
Local thermal perturbations of spins in a solid can convert heat to energy even in a paramagnetic material -- where spins weren't thought to correlate long enough to do so. This effect, which the researchers call 'paramagnon drag thermopower,' converts a temperature difference into an electrical voltage.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Team discovers polymorph selection during crystal growth can be thermodynamically driven
Scientists provide solid calculation to demonstrate the structural transformation in colloidal crystallization can be entirely thermodynamic, in contrast to the kinetic argument, from both theoretical and computational perspectives.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Microbes make chemicals for scent marking in a cat
Domestic cats, like many other mammals, use smelly secretions from anal sacs to mark territory and communicate with other animals. A new study shows that many odiferous compounds from a male cat are actually made not by the cat, but by a community of bacteria living in the anal sacs.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Therapeutic strategies for pregnant women with lupus
A highly gender-biased disease, lupus afflicts females some nine times more than males. Because of the disease's unpredictable turns and debilitating flares -- the risks of which are elevated in postpartum women -- females with the disease are often advised to avoid pregnancy altogether.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Groovy! These grooved patterns better mitigate shock waves
Engineers have discovered a method that could make materials more resilient against massive shocks such as earthquakes or explosions. They found that cutting small grooves in obstacle materials diminished the impacts of what's called the reflected shock wave--once the initial wave has hit the spiral of obstacles and bounced back.
1d ago sciencedaily.com
Team discovers polymorph selection during crystal growth can be thermodynamically driven
Technology is getting smaller—which is good news.
1d ago phys.org
Paramagnetic spins take electrons for a ride, produce electricity from heat
An international team of researchers has observed that local thermal perturbations of spins in a solid can convert heat to energy even in a paramagnetic material—where spins weren't thought to correlate long enough to do so. This effect, which the researchers call "paramagnon drag thermopower," converts a temperature difference into an electrical voltage. This discovery could lead to more efficient thermal energy harvesting—for example, converting car exhaust heat into electric power to enhance fuel-efficiency, or powering smart clothing by body heat.
1d ago phys.org
A Second Interstellar Object May Be Streaking through Our Solar System
The “fluke” find of a  possible visitor from another star after the 2017 discovery of ‘Oumuamua offers thrilling scientific opportunities -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2d ago scientificamerican.com
Using an optical tweezer array of laser-cooled molecules to observe ground state collisions
A team of researchers from Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology has found that they could use an optical tweezer array of laser-cooled molecules to observe ground state collisions between individual molecules. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their work with cooled calcium monofluoride molecules trapped by optical tweezers, and what they learned from their experiments. Svetlana Kotochigova, with Temple University, has published a Perspective piece in the same journal issue outlining the work—she also gives an overview of the work being done with arrays of optical tweezers to better understand molecules in general.
2d ago phys.org
Focus points to reduce opioid overdose deaths identified
A new study identifies specific locations where medication and harm reduction services for people with opioid use disorder should be available in order to have the greatest impact on reducing opioid overdose deaths. The data show that more than half of those who died of an opioid overdose in Massachusetts encountered the health care, public health and/or criminal justice systems within the 12 months prior to their fatal overdose.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
The enigma of bronze age tin
The origin of the tin used in the Bronze Age has long been one of the greatest enigmas in archaeological research. Now researchers have solved part of the puzzle. They were able to proof that tin ingots found at archaeological sites in Israel, Turkey, and Greece do not come from Central Asia, as previously assumed, but from tin deposits in Europe.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
Few people with peanut allergy tolerate peanut after stopping oral immunotherapy
Studies have shown that peanut oral immunotherapy (OIT) -- ingesting small, controlled amounts of peanut protein -- can desensitize adults and children and prevent allergic reactions, but the optimal duration and dose is unknown. In a study that followed participants after successful OIT, discontinuing OIT or continuing OIT at a reduced dose led to a decline in its protective effects. The study also found that blood tests administered before OIT could predict the success of therapy.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
How new loops in DNA packaging help us make diverse antibodies
It's long been known that our immune cells mix and match bits of genetic code to make new kinds of antibodies to fight newly encountered threats. But how these different gene segments come together has been a mystery. A study provides the answer, showing how the classic process of V(D)J recombination makes use of chromatin looping to gather the segments to be spliced.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
Speeding up the drug discovery process to help patients
An international research team is perfecting a method to predict the potential clinical implications of new drugs before clinical trials even start.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
Sticks and stones may break your bones, but this reaction edits skeletons
Since Friedrich Wohler synthesized urea (by accident) back in 1828, chemical synthesis—and organic synthesis for that—has been a driving force in pharmaceutical innovation. Improving the lives of people worldwide, the medicines available nowadays are only possible thanks to the continuous advancement of synthetic chemistry, allowing scientists to design and build new molecules. Now, Marcos G. Suero and his research group at the Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia (ICIQ) present a new reaction that allows for the edition of organic molecule's skeletons, opening up new avenues of research.
2d ago phys.org
This is one way Uber and Lyft want to get around making drivers employees
The ride-hailing companies want to create a third category of workers. That’s had mixed results in other countries.
2d ago technologyreview.com
The enigma of bronze age tin
The origin of the tin used in the Bronze Age has long been one of the greatest enigmas in archaeological research. Now researchers from Heidelberg University and the Curt Engelhorn Centre for Archaeometry in Mannheim have solved part of the puzzle. Using methods of the natural sciences, they examined the tin from the second millennium BCE found at archaeological sites in Israel, Turkey, and Greece. They were able to prove that this tin in the form of ingots does not come from Central Asia, as previously assumed, but from tin deposits in Europe. The findings are proof that even in the Bronze Age, complex and far-reaching trade routes must have existed between Europe and the Eastern Mediterranean. Highly appreciated raw materials like tin as well as amber, glass, and copper were the driving forces of this early international trade network.
2d ago phys.org
How new loops in DNA packaging help us make diverse antibodies
Diversity is good, especially when it comes to antibodies. It's long been known that a gene assembly process called V(D)J recombination allows our immune system to mix and match bits of genetic code, generating new antibodies to conquer newly encountered threats. But how these gene segments come together to be spliced has been a mystery. A new study in Scientific Reports provides the answer.
2d ago phys.org
Land restoration in Latin America shows big potential for climate change mitigation
Land restoration in Latin America and the Caribbean is picking up pace and scaling up projects will help the region meet its pledges under the Bonn Challenge, which aims to restore 350 million hectares of degraded and deforested land worldwide by 2030. A new study led by the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) and Wageningen University supplies a first map of restoration projects in Latin America and shows their potential to mitigate climate change through restoring forests.
2d ago phys.org
China is about to launch its own digital currency. Here’s what we know so far.
2d ago technologyreview.com
Communities that Care prevention system helps to protect youth
Students in Pennsylvania school districts that participated in Communities that Care (CTC) coalitions were significantly less likely to use alcohol or marijuana, or to engage in delinquent behavior than those in non-CTC districts, according to a recent study published in Prevention Science.
2d ago phys.org
Researchers find waterhemp has evolved resistance to four herbicide sites of action
A research study featured in the journal Weed Science provides worrisome new details about the evolution of herbicide resistance in waterhemp—an annual weed that represents a significant threat to Midwest corn and soybean crops.
2d ago phys.org
Environmental pollution in China decreases
For decades pollution in China has paralleled economic growth. But this connection has been weakened in recent years, according to a new international research study published in the Science Advances journal.
2d ago phys.org
A molecular string phone at work
Researchers from the Department of Atomically Resolved Dynamics of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg, the University of Potsdam (both in Germany) and the University of Toronto (Canada) have pieced together a detailed time-lapse movie revealing all the major steps during the catalytic cycle of an enzyme. Surprisingly, the communication between the protein units is accomplished via a water network akin to a string telephone. This communication is aligned with a 'breathing' motion, that is the expansion and contraction of the protein. This time-lapse sequence of structures reveals dynamic motions as a fundamental element in the molecular foundations of biology.
2d ago phys.org
NASA's WFIRST will help uncover the universe's fate
Scientists have discovered that a mysterious pressure dubbed "dark energy" makes up about 68% of the total energy content of the cosmos, but so far we don't know much more about it. Exploring the nature of dark energy is one of the primary reasons NASA is building the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST), a space telescope whose measurements will help illuminate the dark energy puzzle. With a better understanding of dark energy, we will have a better sense of the past and future evolution of the universe.
2d ago phys.org
Environmental pollution in China begins decreasing
For decades pollution in China has paralleled economic growth. But this connection has been weakened in recent years, according to a new international research study.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
'Communities that Care' prevention system helps to protect youth
Students in Pennsylvania school districts that participated in Communities that Care (CTC) coalitions were significantly less likely to use alcohol or marijuana, or to engage in delinquent behavior than those in non-CTC districts, according to a recent study.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
Slower growth in working memory linked to teen driving crashes
Research into why adolescent drivers are involved in motor vehicle crashes, the leading cause of injury and death among 16- to 19-year-olds in the United States, has often focused on driving experience and skills. But a new study suggests that development of the adolescent brain -- in particular, working memory -- may play a critical role in whether a teenager is more likely to crash.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
Addressing serious illness with a serious question to clinicians
A question: 'Would you be surprised if this patient died in the next month?' -- posed to elicit a clinician's overall impression of a patient -- produced a strong correlation. If a clinician answered that they would not be surprised, the patient was twice as likely to die in the next month.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
High social support associated with less violence among male teens in urban neighborhoods
Researchers find that the presence of adult social support is linked to less violence among at-risk teen boys.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
Tiny bubbles in our body could fight cancer better than chemo
Healthy cells in our body release nano-sized bubbles that transfer genetic material such as DNA and RNA to other cells. It's your DNA that stores the important information necessary for RNA to produce proteins and make sure they act accordingly. These bubbly extracellular vesicles could become mini treatment transporters, carrying a combination of therapeutic drugs and genes that target cancer cells and kill them, according to new research from Michigan State University and Stanford University.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
Feds finalize plan to open Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil drilling
The Trump administration announced Thursday its final plan to open Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil drilling, giving the petroleum industry access to the pristine wildland for the first time.
2d ago phys.org
Women also competed for status superiority in mid-Republican Rome
Purple clothing, gold trimmings, earrings and two- or four-wheeled carriages. Among the elite, competition for status superiority was just as vital to women as it was to men in Rome around 2000 years ago. This has been demonstrated in a thesis that investigates the domains and resources women had access to for status competition and how these were regulated by law.
2d ago phys.org
Low sea ice cover in the Arctic
The sea ice extent in the Arctic is nearing its annual minimum at the end of the melt season in September. Only circa 3.9 million square kilometres of the Arctic Ocean are covered by sea ice anymore, according to researchers from the Alfred Wegener Institute and the University of Bremen. This is only the second time that the annual minimum has dropped below four million square kilometres since satellite measurements began in 1979.
2d ago phys.org
Climate change is hurting Philadelphians' health, and the worst is yet to come
The day they found Lee Odgers, it was so hot that the wax candles inside her Northeast Philadelphia apartment had started to melt.
2d ago phys.org
How Do You Know Which Emotion a Facial Expression Represents?
A group of researchers has created a short test to see just how misleading the look on a person's face can be -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2d ago blogs.scientificamerican.com
Male Trinidad guppies find food thanks to females
For male Trinidad Guppies applies: if you are hungry, seek female company. A recent study led by scientists of the the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW) together with other research institutions provides evidence that male guppy fish in the presence of females more often ended up at novel food patches. In contrast, female food discovery was independent of male presence.
2d ago phys.org
VISTA unveils a new image of the Large Magellanic Cloud
The Large Magellanic Cloud, or LMC, is one of our nearest galactic neighbors, at only 163,000 light years from Earth. With its sibling the Small Magellanic Cloud, these are among the nearest dwarf satellite galaxies to the Milky Way. The LMC is also the home of various stellar conglomerates and is an ideal laboratory for astronomers to study the processes that shape galaxies.
2d ago phys.org
Social workers are trying new ways to keep teenagers safe
Over the past four decades the child protection system in England has increasingly concentrated on preventing the abuse and neglect of young children in their homes. In response to multiple government inquiries, such as those following the killing of eight-year-old Victoria Climbié and 17-month-old, Peter Connelly (known as "Baby P"), the focus has been to reduce risk and prevent the abuse and neglect of young children by those looking after them.
2d ago phys.org
Could fungi save the fashion world?
Environmental action group Extinction Rebellion is disrupting London Fashion Week to highlight the harms of throwaway culture and the concurrent climate emergency that the clothing market contributes to. Calling for the cancellation of future fashion weeks in acknowledgment of the crisis, it plans to target show venues and hold a funeral procession called "London Fashion Week: Rest in Peace".
2d ago phys.org
Volcanoes kill more people long after eruptions – those deaths are avoidable
You may think of volcanic eruptions as spectacular but brief explosions. But in reality, these destructive forces wreak havoc before headlines are made and continue long after they fade. As our new research shows, it is the drawn-out nature of volcanic eruptions that can be most fatal—and understanding why is the key to saving lives.
2d ago phys.org
Why carbon dioxide has such outsized influence on Earth's climate
I am often asked how carbon dioxide can have an important effect on global climate when its concentration is so small—just 0.041% of Earth's atmosphere. And human activities are responsible for just 32% of that amount.
2d ago phys.org
Scientists create a nanomaterial that is both twisted and untwisted at the same time
A new nanomaterial developed by scientists at the University of Bath could solve a conundrum faced by scientists probing some of the most promising types of future pharmaceuticals.
2d ago phys.org
Disabled people marginalized by paperwork and programs that aim to help them
Disabled people face being marginalized by the very programs that are designed to help them.
2d ago phys.org
The key to bigger quantum computers could be to build them like Legos
A startup called Quantum Circuits is networking mini quantum devices together to create computers it will claims will be easier to scale up than rival machines.
2d ago technologyreview.com
Philippine capital jolted by quake
An earthquake that struck east of the Philippine capital Manila on Friday set buildings swaying and sent scores into the streets, but authorities said they did not expect any damage.
2d ago phys.org
Extinction of Icelandic walrus coincides with Norse settlement
An international collaboration of scientists in Iceland, Denmark and the Netherlands has for the first time used ancient DNA analyses and C14-dating to demonstrate the past existence of a unique population of Icelandic walrus that went extinct shortly after Norse settlement some 1100 years ago. Walrus hunting and ivory trade was probably the principal cause of extinction, being one of the earliest examples of commercially driven overexploitation of marine resources.
2d ago phys.org
Parasitology: Mother cells as organelle donors
Microbiologists have discovered a recycling process in the eukaryotic parasite Toxoplasma gondii that plays a vital role in the organism's unusual mode of reproduction.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
Nanomaterial created that is both twisted and untwisted at the same time
A new nanomaterial could solve a conundrum faced by scientists probing some of the most promising types of future pharmaceuticals.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
Extinction of Icelandic walrus coincides with Norse settlement
An international collaboration of scientists has for the first time used ancient DNA analyses and C14-dating to demonstrate the past existence of a unique population of Icelandic walrus that went extinct shortly after Norse settlement some 1100 years ago. Walrus hunting and ivory trade was probably the principal cause of extinction, being one of the earliest examples of commercially driven overexploitation of marine resources.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
Disabled people in UK marginalized by paperwork and programs which aim to help them
Research shows disabled people face being marginalized by the very programs that are designed to help them. Projects and welfare systems established to provide support are normalizing disabled people, and unintentionally contributing to their further marginalization.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
Low sea-ice cover in the Arctic
The sea-ice extent in the Arctic is nearing its annual minimum at the end of the melt season in September. Only circa 3.9 million square kilometers of the Arctic Ocean are covered by sea ice any more, according to researchers.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
Waterhemp has evolved resistance to 4 herbicide sites of action
When a waterhemp biotype in eastern Nebraska survived a post-emergent application of the PPO inhibitor fomesafen, scientists decided to take a close look. They discovered the population was resistant to four distinct herbicide sites of action, including PPO inhibitors, ALS inhibitors, EPSPS inhibitors and PS II inhibitors.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
New Delhi announces plan to combat winter toxic air
A plan to combat air pollution in New Delhi was announced by authorities Friday, as the Indian capital looks to lighten the toxic smog blanket that chokes the city, especially in winter.
2d ago phys.org
The bizarre social history of beds
Groucho Marx once joked, "Anything that can't be done in bed isn't worth doing at all." You might think he was referring to sleeping and sex. But humans, at one time or another, have done just about everything in bed.
2d ago phys.org
Mother cells as organelle donors
Microbiologists at LMU and UoG have discovered a recycling process in the eukaryotic parasite Toxoplasma gondii that plays a vital role in the organism's unusual mode of reproduction.
2d ago phys.org
Sudden warming over Antarctica to prolong Australia drought
A rare phenomenon causing "the strongest Antarctic warming on record" is set to deliver more pain to dought-stricken Australia, scientists said Friday.
2d ago phys.org
Lab-Grown Human Mini Brains Show Brainy Activity
As the little structures grow, their constituents specialize into different types of brain cells, begin to form connections and emit brain waves. They could be useful models for development and... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2d ago flex.acast.com
Breeding single-sex animal populations could help prevent disease and poverty
The creation of all-male or all-female groups of animals, known as monosex populations, has become a potentially useful approach in aquaculture and livestock rearing.
2d ago phys.org
Kids are surrounded by AI. They should know how it works.
A new curriculum that helps children understand how algorithms are designed will keep them safe and motivate them to help shape the technology’s future.
2d ago technologyreview.com
'Yank': A new term in biophysics
Biologists and biomedical engineers are proposing to define the term "yank" for changes in force over time, something that our muscles and nerves can feel and respond to.
2d ago phys.org
The first observation of a stable torus of fluid's resonance frequencies
A team of researchers at Laroche Laboratory, Université Paris Diderot and Université de Lyon has recently collected the first measurements of the resonance frequencies of a stable torus of fluid. The method they used to collect these observations, outlined in a paper published in Physical Review Letters, could enable the modeling of a variety of large-scale structures that transiently arise in vortex rings.
2d ago phys.org
Researchers develop an optical sensor that detects very low glucose concentrations
The Optical Research Group of the Universitat Jaume I (GROC-UJI) has developed an optical nanoparticle sensor capable of detecting very low glucose concentrations such as those present in tears by means of fluorescent carbon quantum dots.
2d ago phys.org
Male Trinidad guppies find food thanks to females
For male Trinidad Guppies applies: if you are hungry, seek female company. A recent study provides evidence that male guppy fish in the presence of females more often ended up at novel food patches. In contrast, female food discovery was independent of male presence.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
LH dipeptide may improve mental health
Researchers have made discoveries regarding the effect of the dipeptide Leucine-Histidine (LH) in suppressing microglial activation and depression-associated emotional disturbances. LH dipeptide is found in fermented foods such as blue cheese and natto (fermented soy beans). Foods rich in LH dipeptide may be a safe, preventive method for maintaining good mental health.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
Salmon Tales: Sex, myth and molecular genetics of an iconic fish
A sockeye salmon's life ends right back where it began, culminating in an anadromous drama of sex, decay and sacrifice.
2d ago phys.org
Superficially satisfying spending
The overuse of packaging is a growing environmental problem in terms of resource use and waste production. Unfortunately, interesting and intriguing packaging is a crucial part of the modern approach to marketing and is perceived by many consumers, particularly those buying high-end goods, such as smartphones and other electronic gadgets as an essential part of the purchase experience.
2d ago phys.org
Lightning flashes illuminate storm behavior
Anybody who has ever tried to photograph lightning knows that it takes patience and special camera equipment. Now, a new study is using those brief but brilliant flashes to illuminate cloud structures and shed light on storm cell behavior, giving weather forecasters new tools for predicting lightning hazards.
2d ago phys.org
Green with rage: Women climate change leaders face online attacks
Women leaders who support climate action are being attacked online with increasing regularity. These attacks should be viewed as a problem not only for the planet, but also to the goals of achieving gender equality and more inclusive, democratic politics.
2d ago phys.org
Researchers use light to control high-speed chemical reactions in a new way
Many natural and synthetic chemical systems react and change their properties in the presence of certain kinds of light. These reactions can occur too quickly for ordinary instruments to see. For the first time, researchers adopted a novel technique to observe the high-speed reactions. A special kind of reaction observed with this method could lead to new optical nanotechnology.
2d ago phys.org
Cancer cells prefer a 'comfort cruise,' follow predictable paths of least resistance
New research from biomedical engineers reveals that while cancer cells move quickly in metastasis, they're rather lazy in which paths they choose -- opting to move through wider, easier to navigate spaces rather than smaller, confined spaces to reduce energy requirements during movement.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
Researchers use light to control high-speed chemical reactions in a new way
Many natural and synthetic chemical systems react and change their properties in the presence of certain kinds of light. These reactions can occur too quickly for ordinary instruments to see. For the first time, researchers adopted a novel technique to observe the high-speed reactions. A special kind of reaction observed with this method could lead to new optical nanotechnology.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
Testing quantum mechanics in a non-inertial reference frame using a rotating interferometer
A team of researchers from the University of Glasgow and the University of Southampton has devised a novel way to test quantum mechanics in a non-inertial reference frame by using a rotating interferometer. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes studying the Hong-Ou-Mandel interference using fiber coils on a rotating disk, and what they found.
2d ago phys.org
Image: Hubble glimpses faint galaxy
This image, taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, focuses on an object named UGC 695, which is located 30 million light-years away within the constellation Cetus (the Sea Monster), also known as the Whale. A bounty of diverse background galaxies is also visible in this image.
2d ago phys.org
Significant progress made in inverse photoconductance
Valencia University (UV) researchers have modified the photoconductance of nanoparticles of tungsten oxide (WO3) in a controlled manner. This has potential applications in photonics and optomechanics. The results have been published in Advanced Science.
2d ago phys.org
Image: Baja California
This Copernicus Sentinel-1 image takes us just south of the US border, to the region of Baja California in northwest Mexico. Its capital city, Mexicali, is visible top left of the image.
2d ago phys.org
16 things you probably didn't know about cephalopod sex
If you've ever seen the Monterey Bay Aquarium's "Tentacles" exhibit, you know that cephalopods (squids, octopuses, and their kin) are awesome creatures. They can change the texture and color of their skin in the blink of an eye and "taste" things using suckers on their arms. They also have developed a variety of complex social and survival behaviors.
2d ago phys.org
Tropical mountain rivers are where the magic happens
Large tropical mountain river systems aren't getting the respect they deserve—at least not when it comes to research and conservation.
2d ago phys.org
New report takes in-depth look at three factors contributing to sea level rise along the U.S. East Coast
Sea levels in many areas across the global ocean are rising. Since the turn of the 20th century, the seas have risen between six and eight inches globally.
2d ago phys.org
X-ray experiments contribute to studies of a drug now approved to combat tuberculosis
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a new antibiotic that, in combination with two existing antibiotics, can tackle one of the most formidable and deadly treatment-resistant forms of the bacterium that causes tuberculosis. The new antibiotic, called pretomanid (PA-824), can work with the other drugs like a deadly cocktail—triggering the bacteria (Mycobacterium tuberculosis) to release nitric oxide. This can burst the bacteria's cell walls and poison the microorganisms.
2d ago phys.org
Mathematical modelling sheds new light on how continents may have formed
Life is unique to our planet. Or is it?
2d ago phys.org
Study casts doubt on accuracy of mobile drug testing devices
New research conducted by the Lambert Initiative for Cannabinoid Therapeutics at the University of Sydney calls into question the reliability of the two devices that are currently being used for mobile drug testing (MDT) in NSW and other Australian states. These devices were used in the prosecution of almost 10,000 cannabis users for drug driving in NSW in 2016 (the last year for which data are available).
2d ago phys.org
SLIPS and pitfalls: Synthetic surfaces inspired by a pitcher pitfall trap
Our understanding of how to manipulate and control liquids in technology has been transformed by the functional surfaces evolved by living organisms to interact with their environment. Water-repellent lotus leaves, water-collecting wing-cases of desert beetles, and water-removing gecko skin are some of the many organisms that have inspired solutions to challenges in liquid manipulating technologies. The requirement for liquid-repellent surfaces infiltrates industries from architecture, to medical devices, and household products.
2d ago phys.org
Verdict for China's efforts on coal emissions
Researchers from China, France and the USA have evaluated China's success in stemming emissions from its coal-fired power plants (CPPs). CPPs are one of the main contributors to air pollution in China, and their proliferation over the last 20 years has had significant impacts on air quality and public health. These impacts led authorities to introduce measures to control emissions from CPPs and reduce their effects.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
The rare molecule weighing in on the birth of planets
Astronomers using one of the most advanced radio telescopes have discovered a rare molecule in the dust and gas disc around a young star -- and it may provide an answer to one of the conundrums facing astronomers.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
Engineers develop 'blackest black' material to date
Engineers have cooked up a material made of carbon nanotubes that is 10 times blacker than anything that has previously been reported.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
Battery icons shape perceptions of time and space and define user identities
Research finds battery icons on mobile phones shape how people view time and space, and how battery conservation practices define user identities.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
Over one-fifth of injured US adult cyclists were not wearing a helmet
Men and ethnic minorities are less likely to wear cycle helmets and more likely to suffer from head and neck injuries in accidents, according to new research.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
B cells linked to immunotherapy for melanoma
Immunotherapy uses our body's own immune system to fight cancer. Many current immunotherapies focus on T cells, but new research shows that another type of cell, B cells, might also play an important part in immunotherapies for cancer.
2d ago sciencedaily.com
Brain-inspired computing could tackle big problems in a small way
While computers have become smaller and more powerful and supercomputers and parallel computing have become the standard, we are about to hit a wall in energy and miniaturization. Now, researchers have designed a 2D device that can provide more than yes-or-no answers and could be more brain-like than current computing architectures.
2d ago sciencedaily.com