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US tornado frequency shifting eastward from Great Plains
A new study finds that over the past four decades, tornado frequency has increased over a large swath of the Midwest and Southeast and decreased in portions of the central and southern Great Plains, a region traditionally associated with Tornado Alley.
1h ago sciencedaily.com
Arctic greening thaws permafrost, boosts runoff
A new collaborative study has investigated Arctic shrub-snow interactions to obtain a better understanding of the far north's tundra and vast permafrost system. Incorporating extensive in situ observations, scientists tested their theories with a novel 3D computer model and confirmed that shrubs can lead to significant degradation of the permafrost layer that has remained frozen for tens of thousands of years. These interactions are driving increases in discharges of fresh water into rivers, lakes and oceans.
1h ago sciencedaily.com
Largest autism sequencing study to date yields 102 genes associated with ASD
In the largest genetic sequencing study of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to date, researchers have identified 102 genes associated with ASD, and report significant progress toward teasing apart the genes associated with ASD from those associated with intellectual disability and developmental delay, conditions between which there is often overlap.
1h ago sciencedaily.com
Simple test may help predict long-term outcome after stroke
A simple test taken within a week of a stroke may help predict how well people will have recovered up to three years later.
1h ago sciencedaily.com
Eliminating emissions in India and China could add years to people's lives
In a recent study, researchers wanted to know how replacing coal-fired powerplants in China and India with clean, renewable energy could benefit human health and save lives in the future. The researchers found that eliminating harmful emissions from powerplants could save an estimated annual 15 million years of life in China and 11 million years of life in India.
1h ago sciencedaily.com
A 150-year-old drug might improve radiation therapy for cancer
A drug first identified 150 years ago and used as a smooth-muscle relaxant might make tumors more sensitive to radiation therapy. Researchers found that the drug papaverine inhibits the respiration of mitochondria, the oxygen-consuming and energy-making components of cells, and sensitizes model tumors to radiation. They found that the drug does not affect the radiation sensitivity of well-oxygenated normal tissues.
1h ago sciencedaily.com
Eliminating emissions in India and China could add years to people's lives
The 2.7 billion people who live in China and India—more than a third of the world's population—regularly breath some of the dirtiest air on the planet. Air pollution is one of the largest contributors to death in both countries, ranked 4th in China and 5th in India, and harmful emissions from coal-fire powerplants are a major contributing factor.
2h ago phys.org
Tinder For Cheetahs; and An Unusual Blindness
Scientific American assistant news editor Tanya Lewis and collections editor Andrea Gawrylewski host a new podcast that takes an deeper look at short articles from the Advances news section of the... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h ago flex.acast.com
Arctic greening thaws permafrost, boosts runoff
A new collaborative study has investigated Arctic shrub-snow interactions to obtain a better understanding of the far north's tundra and vast permafrost system. Incorporating extensive in situ observations, Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists tested their theories with a novel 3-D computer model and confirmed that shrubs can lead to significant degradation of the permafrost layer that has remained frozen for tens of thousands of years. These interactions are driving increases in discharges of fresh water into rivers, lakes and oceans.
2h ago phys.org
Baidu just showed that China and the US can collaborate on AI
3h ago technologyreview.com
Mexico's vaquita porpoise gets new chance; 6 sighted
Experts want to enclose a small area of the Gulf of California where the critically endangered vaquita porpoise remains after they sighted about a half dozen of the elusive creatures in September.
3h ago phys.org
Broadcaster urges football authorities not to leave market 'to criminals'
Broadcaster Eleven Sports says it will no longer show matches during the Saturday afternoon football blackout in the UK but has urged authorities not to leave the market "in the hands of criminals".
3h ago phys.org
Newly published files confirm plan to move Assange to Russia
Julian Assange: Hacker. Journalist. Diplomat? Newly released Ecuadorean government documents have laid bare an unorthodox attempt to extricate the WikiLeaks founder from his embassy hideaway in London by naming him as a political counselor to the country's embassy in Moscow.
3h ago phys.org
Conceptual framework to study role of exercise in multiple sclerosis
Researchers have proposed a conceptual framework for examining the relationship between exercise and adaptive neuroplasticity in the population with multiple sclerosis (MS).
3h ago sciencedaily.com
First GWAS analysis of 'type 1.5 diabetes' reveals links between immune and metabolic disease
Scientists who performed the largest-ever genetic study of a puzzling type of adult-onset diabetes have uncovered new connections to the two major types of diabetes, offering intriguing insights into more accurate diagnosis and better treatment. Latent automimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is a relatively common disorder that shares features of type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes.
3h ago sciencedaily.com
How does brain structure influence performance on language tasks?
The architecture of each person's brain is unique, and differences may influence how quickly people can complete various cognitive tasks. But how neuroanatomy impacts performance is largely an open question. To learn more, scientists are developing a new tool -- computational models of the brain -- to simulate how the structure of the brain may impact brain activity and, ultimately, human behavior.
4h ago sciencedaily.com
Scientists find stem cell proliferation is controlled directly by nervous system
Somatic stem cells are microscopic workhorses, constantly regenerating cells throughout the body: skin and the lining of the intestine, for example. And to University of Illinois neuroscientists, they represent untapped potential.
4h ago phys.org
Stem cell proliferation is controlled directly by nervous system, scientists find
A new study demonstrates that stem cell proliferation is directly controlled by the autonomic nervous system.
4h ago sciencedaily.com
Wind farms and reducing hurricane precipitation
New research reveals an unexpected benefit of large-scale offshore wind farms: the ability to lessen precipitation from hurricanes.
4h ago sciencedaily.com
Massive organism is crashing on our watch
Researchers have conducted the first complete assessment of the Pando aspen clone and the results show continuing deterioration of this 'forest of one tree.' While a portion of the famed grove is recovery nicely as a result of previous restoration, the majority of Pando (Latin for 'I Spread') is diminishing by attrition.
4h ago sciencedaily.com
Life on the floor of the Arctic Ocean, with rigor and in detail
In an extensive and rigorous study of animal life on the Central Arctic Ocean floor, researchers have shown that water depth and food availability influence the species composition, density, and biomass of benthic communities.
4h ago sciencedaily.com
Immune culprits linked to inflammation and bone loss in gum disease identified
An unhealthy population of microbes in the mouth triggers specialized immune cells that inflame and destroy tissues, leading to the type of bone loss associated with a severe form of gum disease, according to a new study in mice and humans. The findings could have implications for new treatment approaches for the condition.
4h ago sciencedaily.com
Life on the floor of the Arctic Ocean, with rigor and in detail
In an extensive and rigorous study of animal life on the Central Arctic Ocean floor, researchers have shown that water depth and food availability influence the species composition, density, and biomass of benthic communities, according to a study published October 17, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE. The study, led by a team including Antje Boetius of the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany, also confirmed for the first time that species diversity on the Arctic floor display a similar depth-related pattern to that seen in more temperate waters.
4h ago phys.org
Vast leukemia dataset could help researchers match therapies to patients
Data on the molecular makeup and drug sensitivity of hundreds of patient samples could accelerate progress against the aggressive blood cancer acute myeloid leukemia.
4h ago sciencedaily.com
Virtual reality can help make people more compassionate compared to other media
Researchers found that people who underwent a virtual reality experience, called 'Becoming Homeless,' were more empathetic toward the homeless and more likely to sign a petition in support of affordable housing than other study participants.
4h ago sciencedaily.com
Picture perfect: Researchers gain clearest ever image of Ebola virus protein
Near-atomic resolution model of viral protein complex brings clearer understanding of the viral mechanics.
4h ago sciencedaily.com
Dandelion seeds reveal newly discovered form of natural flight
A study of dandelion seeds in motion has revealed a form of flight not seen before, and explains why the plant is among nature's best fliers.
4h ago sciencedaily.com
Pupil's brain recognizes the perfect teacher
Human and avian youngsters learn behaviors by imitating adults. But learners are selective in who they copy, and scientists don't understand how they choose the right teacher. Young male zebra finches must learn to copy the song of an adult male to mate, but juveniles won't imitate songs played through a loudspeaker or sung by other species of birds. New findings show how the juvenile birds identify the right teacher.
4h ago sciencedaily.com
Unprecedented look at electron: Size limit for undiscovered subatomic particles determined
A new study suggests that many theorized heavy particles, if they exist at all, do not have the properties needed to explain the predominance of matter over antimatter in the universe. If confirmed, the findings would force significant revisions to several prominent theories posed as alternatives to the Standard Model of particle physics, which was developed in the early 1970s.
4h ago sciencedaily.com
Arctic ice sets speed limit for major ocean current
Scientists have now identified a key mechanism, which they call the 'ice-ocean governor,' that controls how fast the Beaufort Gyre spins and how much fresh water it stores. Researchers report that the Arctic's ice cover essentially sets a speed limit on the gyre's spin.
4h ago sciencedaily.com
First comprehensive assessment of Pando reveals critical threats
Utah State University researchers Paul Rogers and Darren McAvoy have conducted the first complete assessment of the Pando aspen clone and the results show continuing deterioration of this 'forest of one tree.' While a portion of the famed grove is recovery nicely as a result of previous restoration, the majority of Pando (Latin for "I Spread") is diminishing by attrition.
4h ago phys.org
NASA catches the scattered remains of former Tropical Storm Tara
NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of the remnants of former Tropical Storm Tara after it dissipated near the coast of western Mexico's Jalisco state. Jalisco is a western Mexican state along the Eastern Pacific Ocean.
4h ago phys.org
US tops WEF competitiveness ranking but obesity weighs on score
The United States has the world's most competitive economy, a World Economic Forum ranking showed Wednesday, but inequality and health problems including obesity took a toll on its score.
4h ago phys.org
Twitter releases 10 million tweets from foreign influence efforts
Twitter on Wednesday released data on foreign influence campaigns on its platform showing some 10 million tweets, mostly from Russia, dating back as far as 2009.
5h ago phys.org
NASA's Fermi mission energizes the sky with gamma-ray constellations
Long ago, sky watchers linked the brightest stars into patterns reflecting animals, heroes, monsters and even scientific instruments into what is now an official collection of 88 constellations. Now scientists with NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have devised a set of modern constellations constructed from sources in the gamma-ray sky to celebrate the mission's 10th year of operations.
5h ago phys.org
Attending the 'best' high school may yield benefits and risks for students
Parents often go to great lengths to ensure that their children attend top schools, surrounded by high-achieving peers who often come from advantaged backgrounds. But data collected from individuals over a span of 50 years suggests that these aspects of selective schools aren't uniformly beneficial to students' educational and professional outcomes in the following decades.
5h ago phys.org
Study uncovers new link between neonicotinoid pesticide exposure and bumblebee decline
Adding to growing evidence that pesticide use may be contributing to the decline of many bumblebee species across North America, a new study reveals that daily consumption of even small doses of a widely used class of insecticides known as neonicotinoids reduces the survival of queen and male bees, which are critical to the survival of wild populations. The study also found that exposure to the chemicals alters the expression of genes regulating biological functions such as locomotion, reproduction, immunity, and learning and memory, suggesting that neonicotinoids may be having a greater negative impact on the viability of wild bumblebee populations than previously thought.
5h ago phys.org
Evidence of earliest life on Earth disputed
When Australian scientists presented evidence in 2016 of life on Earth 3.7 billon years ago—pushing the record back 220 million years—it was a big deal, influencing even the search for life on Mars.
5h ago phys.org
Public investment funds join call for independent Facebook chair
Four public investment fund officials on Wednesday joined a call to install an independent chairman at Facebook, saying the move would improve governance and accountability at the world's biggest social network.
5h ago phys.org
EPA puts off final decision on science transparency rule
The Environmental Protection Agency says it is putting off for at least a year any final announcement on a controversial proposal overhauling how the agency evaluates science. Critics say it could bar the use of landmark public health studies.
5h ago phys.org
Glitzy 'Science Oscars' to make stars of researchers
Nine scientists were recognized Wednesday with a "Breakthrough Prize," a $3 million Silicon Valley-funded award meant to confer Oscars-style glamour and prestige on the basic sciences.
5h ago phys.org
Substantial changes in air pollution across China during 2015 to 2017
The first detailed analysis of air pollution trends in China reveals a 20 per cent drop in concentrations of particulate pollution over the last three years (2015-2017).
5h ago phys.org
Near-atomic resolution model of Ebola virus protein brings clearer understanding of the viral mechanics
Researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have for the first time imaged the structure of a central component of the Ebola virus at near-atomic resolution.
5h ago phys.org
Startup plans to launch small satellites from Virginia coast
A California-based startup said Wednesday that it will rocket small satellites into orbit from Virginia, an endeavor that reflects increasing demand from companies and governments alike to monitor ships, crops and the weather from space.
5h ago phys.org
Pupil's brain recognizes the perfect teacher
Youngsters learn many important behaviors by imitating adults. But young learners are selective in who they copy, and scientists don't understand how they choose the right teacher.
5h ago phys.org
Study supports Standard Model of particle physics, excludes alternative models
In a new study, researchers at Northwestern, Harvard and Yale universities examined the shape of an electron's charge with unprecedented precision to confirm that it is perfectly spherical. A slightly squashed charge could have indicated unknown, hard-to-detect heavy particles in the electron's presence, a discovery that could have upended the global physics community.
5h ago phys.org
Dandelion seeds reveal newly discovered form of natural flight
The extraordinary flying ability of dandelion seeds is possible thanks to a form of flight that has not been seen before in nature, research has revealed.
5h ago phys.org
Probiotics and antibiotics create a killer combination
In the fight against drug-resistant bacteria, MIT researchers have enlisted the help of beneficial bacteria known as probiotics.
5h ago phys.org
Researchers find bacterioplankton rely on environmental vitamin B1 rather than making their own
New research from North Carolina State University and the University of Copenhagen finds that more bacterioplankton utilize vitamin B1 or B1 precursors from their environment than synthesize their own. The researchers also found that B1 availability can directly limit bacterioplankton growth, which could have larger impacts on aquatic microbial food webs, as well as energy and nutrient exchange.
5h ago phys.org
Social media buffers depression among older adults with pain
With a few finger strokes or swipes on a computer or cell phone, seniors with pain reduce the risk of depression when visiting social media sites.
5h ago phys.org
Bacterioplankton: Taking their vitamins
New research finds that more bacterioplankton utilize vitamin B1 or B1 precursors from their environment than synthesize their own. The researchers also found that B1 availability can directly limit bacterioplankton growth, which could have larger impacts on aquatic microbial food webs, as well as energy and nutrient exchange.
5h ago sciencedaily.com
Substantial changes in air pollution across China during 2015 to 2017
The first detailed analysis of air pollution trends in China reveals a 20 per cent drop in concentrations of particulate pollution over the last three years (2015-2017).
5h ago sciencedaily.com
New study supports survival of microbes and organic compounds in space
Environmental data collected from an exposure panel exposed to the space environment for one year suggests that microbes and organic compounds present in the exposure panel would be able to survive, supporting the possibility of interplanetary migration of microbes and organic compounds. A description of the study and the resulting environmental data is published in Astrobiology, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.
5h ago phys.org
Evidence of dogs accompanying humans to Europe during Neolithic
A team of researchers from across Europe and Israel has found evidence of dogs traveling with people from the Near East to Europe during the Neolithic. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes their genetic study of dogs living in ancient Europe and the Near East and what they found.
6h ago phys.org
Blooming early! Japan's famed cherry blossoms make unexpected appearance
The delicate blossoms of the cherry tree might be synonymous with the onset of spring in Japan—except this year they're also blooming in autumn, a weather forecasting company said Wednesday.
7h ago phys.org
Rising Seas Threaten Iconic Mediterranean Sites
The canals of Venice and an ancient Phoenician city are among the historic sites imperiled by sea level rise and coastal erosion -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h ago scientificamerican.com
Moss rapidly detects, tracks air pollutants in real time
Moss, one of the world's oldest plants, is surprisingly in tune with the atmosphere around it. Now in a study appearing in ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry, scientists report that they have found a simple and inexpensive way to detect air pollutants, specifically sulfur dioxide, in real time based on subtle changes in moss leaves. The discovery could rapidly alert authorities to potentially dangerous alterations in air quality using a sustainable, natural plant sensor.
7h ago phys.org
Designers are reinventing hurricane maps for an era of extreme weather
As climate dangers rise, researchers are testing new ways of communicating clearly about uncertainty.
7h ago technologyreview.com
Bone cell response to mechanical force is balance of injury and repair
Scientists have revealed the intricate process that bone cells use to repair themselves after mechanical injury.
7h ago sciencedaily.com
Astronomers find a cosmic Titan in the early universe
Astronomers have discovered a titanic structure in the early universe, just two billion years after the Big Bang. This galaxy proto-supercluster, nicknamed Hyperion, is the largest and most massive structure yet found at such a remote time and distance.
7h ago sciencedaily.com
Bursting the clouds for better communication
We live in an age of long-range information. Research is turning towards the use of lasers which have several advantages. However, this new technology faces a major problem: clouds. Due to their density, clouds stop the laser beams and scramble the transfer of information. Researchers have now devised an ultra-hot laser that creates a temporary hole in the cloud, which lets the laser beam containing the information pass through.
7h ago sciencedaily.com
3D-printed lithium-ion batteries
Electric vehicles and most electronic devices, such as cell phones and laptop computers, are powered by lithium-ion batteries. Until now, manufacturers have had to design their devices around the size and shape of commercially available batteries. But researchers have developed a new method to 3D print lithium-ion batteries in virtually any shape.
7h ago sciencedaily.com
Moss rapidly detects, tracks air pollutants in real time
Moss, one of the world's oldest plants, is surprisingly in tune with the atmosphere around it. Now scientists report that they have found a simple and inexpensive way to detect air pollutants, specifically sulfur dioxide, in real time based on subtle changes in moss leaves. The discovery could rapidly alert authorities to potentially dangerous alterations in air quality using a sustainable, natural plant sensor.
7h ago sciencedaily.com
Taking steps toward a wearable artificial kidney
There just aren't enough kidney transplants available for the millions of people with renal failure. Aside from a transplant, the only alternative for patients is to undergo regular dialysis sessions to clear harmful cellular waste from their bodies. Now, scientists report a new urea sorbent that could accelerate progress toward the development of a lightweight, wearable artificial kidney with the potential to make dialysis more convenient, comfortable and effective.
7h ago sciencedaily.com
World Heritage Sites threatened by rising sea levels
In the Mediterranean region, there are numerous UNESCO World Heritage Sites in low-lying coastal areas. In the course of the 21st century, these sites will increasingly be at risk by storm surges and increasing coastal erosion due to sea-level rise.
7h ago sciencedaily.com
Selfish people have fewer children and earn less money
What happens to those who behave unselfishly and make sacrifices for the sake of others? According to an interdisciplinary study, unselfish people tend both to have more children and to receive higher salaries, in comparison to more selfish people.
7h ago sciencedaily.com
Regulating microglial activity may reduce inflammation in neurodegenerative diseases
A group of investigators is proposing that targeting immune checkpoints -- molecules that regulate the activity of the immune system -- in immune cells called microglia could reduce the inflammatory aspects of important neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and ALS.
7h ago sciencedaily.com
Double dust ring test could spot migrating planets
Astrophysicist now have a way of finally telling whether newly forming planets are migrating within the disc of dust and gas that typically surrounds stars or whether they are simply staying put in the same orbit around the star.
7h ago sciencedaily.com
New imaging tool captures how sound moves through the chinchilla ear
Researchers have developed a new device that can be used to visualize how sound-induced vibrations travel through the ear.
7h ago sciencedaily.com
Breastfeeding protects infants from antibiotic-resistant bacteria
A new study shows that infants that are breastfed for at least six months have less antibiotic-resistant bacteria in their gut compared with babies breastfed for a shorter time. On the other hand, antibiotic use by mothers increases the number of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in infants.
7h ago sciencedaily.com
Going to bed with your ex might not be as bad you think
Conventional wisdom holds that people set themselves up for even greater heartache when they jump into bed with their ex-partner after a breakup. However, according to new findings, having sex with an ex doesn't seem to hinder moving on after the breakup. This is true even for those who continue to pine for their ex.
7h ago sciencedaily.com
Astronomers find a cosmic Titan in the early universe
An international team of astronomers has discovered a titanic structure in the early Universe, just two billion years after the Big Bang. This galaxy proto-supercluster, nicknamed Hyperion, is the largest and most massive structure yet found at such a remote time and distance.
7h ago phys.org
Prioritizing help for the poorest hit by deadly natural disasters
A new statistical tool to help target resources following deadly natural disasters has been created by the University of Bristol, allowing governments to prioritise getting aid to the most vulnerable people.
7h ago phys.org
Attending the 'best' high school may yield benefits and risks for students
Parents often go to great lengths to ensure that their children attend top schools, surrounded by high-achieving peers who often come from advantaged backgrounds. But data collected from individuals over a span of 50 years suggests that these aspects of selective schools aren't uniformly beneficial to students' educational and professional outcomes in the following decades.
7h ago sciencedaily.com
A curious branch of plankton evolution
Planktonic foraminifera -- tiny, shelled organisms that float in the sea -- left behind one of the most complete fossil records of evolutionary history in deep sea deposits. Consequently, evolutionists have a relatively sturdy grasp on when and how new lineages arose. However, a new study reveals that one lineage evolved much more rapidly than everyone predicted, and researchers are looking beyond Darwin's original theories of gradual evolution to understand why.
7h ago sciencedaily.com
Double dust ring test could spot migrating planets
New research by a team led by an astrophysicist at the University of Warwick has a way of finally telling whether newly forming planets are migrating within the disc of dust and gas that typically surrounds stars or whether they are simply staying put in the same orbit around the star.
7h ago phys.org
Taking steps toward a wearable artificial kidney
There just aren't enough kidney transplants available for the millions of people with renal failure. Aside from a transplant, the only alternative for patients is to undergo regular dialysis sessions to clear harmful cellular waste from their bodies. Now, scientists report in ACS Nano a new urea sorbent that could accelerate progress toward the development of a lightweight, wearable artificial kidney with the potential to make dialysis more convenient, comfortable and effective.
7h ago phys.org
A curious branch of plankton evolution
Planktonic foraminifera (forams) - tiny, shelled organisms that float in the sea—left behind one of the most complete fossil records of evolutionary history in deep sea deposits. Consequently, evolutionists have a relatively sturdy grasp on when and how new lineages arose and developed their own unique features. However, a study publishing October 17 in the journal iScience reveals that one foram lineage evolved much more rapidly than everyone predicted, and researchers are looking beyond Darwin's original theories of gradual evolution to understand why.
7h ago phys.org
Getting to the root of long-term tree swallow declines
Aerial insectivores—birds that hunt for insect prey on the wing—are declining across North America. Conserving vulnerable species such as these requires a good understanding of the factors impacting them at every stage of life. Juveniles and adults, for example, may face different threats and die at different rates. Two new studies from The Condor: Ornithological Applications take a deep dive into the demographic factors behind declining populations of Tree Swallows and show that although specifics may vary between locations, action is needed to address environmental changes affecting these birds across their geographic range.
7h ago phys.org
Societies can remain distinct despite migration
Countries around the world can retain distinct cultures despite migration, new research shows.
7h ago phys.org
Sydney to move away from CBD model
Sydney may soon undergo a transition from a monocentric city with sprawling suburbs radiating from one CBD, to a polycentric model—one marked by several sub-centres—according to a recent study led by a multidisciplinary team at the University of Sydney.
7h ago phys.org
School students identify sounds caused by solar storm
School students have successfully identified sounds caused by a solar storm in the Earth's magnetic shield, as part of a Queen Mary University of London research project.
7h ago phys.org
Blue crab baby sizes and shapes influence their survival
Like people, blue crabs aren't all the same sizes and shapes. Now Rutgers scientists have discovered substantial differences in the body structures of larval crab siblings and among larvae from different mothers. And that can mean the difference between an early death and survival into adulthood for this important commercial and recreational species.
7h ago phys.org
Study challenges concerns around imported farmed shrimp
Scientists at the University of Stirling have challenged concerns around the consumption of imported farmed shrimp – with new research indicating that it is as safe as any other seafood product.
8h ago phys.org
Banking on private finance to tackle the world's water crisis
With global water resources under ever-increasing stress, a new report from WWF, ING and The Boston Consulting Group (BCG) calls for urgent efforts by corporates, investors, governments and NGOs to deliver sustainable, bankable freshwater projects, which will help improve water security, create financial value and enhance the health of the world's river basins.
8h ago phys.org
Study shows city rats eat better than country rats
A pair of researchers, one with Trent University in Canada, the other the University of Manchester in the U.K. has found evidence that rats living in cities have a much richer diet than rats living in the country. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Eric Guiry and Michael Buckley describe their isotopic analysis of rats living in Toronto during the years 1790 to 1890, and what they found.
8h ago phys.org
Death of a Fossil Hunter
Junchang Lü was is one of the most important dinosaur researchers of the past half century -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h ago blogs.scientificamerican.com
The Moon helps reveal secrets of the universe
The Moon may be the key to unlocking how the first stars and galaxies shaped the early universe.
8h ago phys.org
Partisanship runs deep in America - even among 'independents'
In voting, it doesn't really matter which party you register with on paper.
8h ago phys.org
How monitoring local water supplies can build community
Water insecurity is a touchstone for 2018. Our planet isn't running out of water, but various kinds of mismanagement have led to local water crises across the planet, directly threatening millions of people.
8h ago phys.org
Regulating gene transcription using light
Researchers led by Mustafa Khammash have developed a new method that uses blue light to control the transcription of DNA into RNA in single cells. The technology could also be used in tissue engineering and stem cell research.
8h ago phys.org
Twitter has released more than 10 million tweets linked to election interference
8h ago technologyreview.com
Revolutionary Microscopy Technique Nets Most Lucrative Prize in Science
The Breakthrough awards, each worth U.S. $3 million, honor advances in the life sciences, physics and mathematics -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h ago scientificamerican.com
Protein derived from cottonseed for human nutrition one step closer to reality
Cottonseed ground into flour to deliver protein to millions of people, a project to which Dr. Keerti Rathore has devoted more than half his professional career, is one step closer to reality.
8h ago phys.org
Legal cannabis vs. black market: Can it compete?
The Oct. 17 launch of legal recreational cannabis in Canada brings many challenges. Retailers are now worrying about possible product shortages or web site glitches. Governments are still debating how to handle amnesties, impaired driving, and workplace safety.
8h ago phys.org
Combined X-ray and fluorescence microscope reveals unseen molecular details
A research team from the University of Göttingen has commissioned a worldwide unique microscope combination at DESY's X-ray source PETRA III to gain novel insights into biological cells. The team led by Tim Salditt and Sarah Köster describes the combined X-ray and optical fluorescence microscope in the journal Nature Communications. To test the performance of the device installed at DESY's measuring station P10, the scientists investigated heart muscle cells with their new method.
8h ago phys.org
Fish undisturbed by flash photography
Fish experience stress, as do mammals and humans. When under stress, fish release the hormones adrenaline and cortisol. A team of scientists spearheaded by IGB has investigated whether flash photography induces an increase in cortisol levels of fish in aquariums. The good news: you need not worry about taking snapshots of the ram cichlid.
8h ago phys.org
Eighty tons of illegal bluefin tuna pose a threat to sustainable fisheries and human health
Spanish authorities announced the arrest of 76 people involved in a large illegal trade of bluefin tuna worth over €12 million per year between Malta and Spain, and with the engagement of other EU countries. 80,000 kg of illegally caught and marketed tuna were seized in the investigation, led under the coordination of EUROPOL. Irregularities found in the handling of the fish could also cause food poisoning.
8h ago phys.org
Are two parents better than one? Yes, but only if you're a burying beetle
Parenting behaviour varies greatly across the animal kingdom. In most mammals, only mothers look after the young, and in most fishes, only fathers look after the young. When it comes to birds, mothers and fathers usually work together to build a nest, feed their chicks, keep them warm, and protect them from predators. At the opposite end of the spectrum are insects, where in most cases, the young are left to fend for themselves.
8h ago phys.org
Cellular clean-up crews linked to how body handles sugar
How our bodies handle glucose—the simple sugar that provides energy from the food we eat—appears to be intertwined with how cells keep themselves functioning normally, according to new University of Chicago research.
8h ago phys.org
Researchers investigate the peculiar radio source IC 1531
An international team of researchers has investigated a peculiar extragalactic radio source known as IC 1531. The new study analyzes the nature of IC 1531's high-energy emission, suggesting that the source is a radio galaxy. The findings are presented in a paper published October 5 on arXiv.org.
8h ago phys.org
Cellular stress defense
Small heat-shock proteins (sHSPs) are molecular chaperones that bind to unfolded proteins to prevent protein aggregation and defend against cellular stress. Mutations in human sHSPs are associated with inherited diseases including cataract and cardiomyopathy.
8h ago phys.org
Award-winning algorithm takes search for habitable planets to the next level
An international team of scientists, including KAUST high performance computing experts and astronomers from the Paris Observatory and the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), in collaboration with NVIDIA, is taking the search for habitable planets and observation of first epoch galaxies to the next level.
8h ago phys.org
Blue crab baby sizes and shapes influence their survival
Like people, blue crabs aren't all the same sizes and shapes. Now scientists have discovered substantial differences in the body structures of larval crab siblings and among larvae from different mothers. And that can mean the difference between an early death and survival into adulthood for this important commercial and recreational species.
8h ago sciencedaily.com
Plant hormone makes space farming a possibility
With scarce nutrients and weak gravity, growing potatoes on the Moon or on other planets seems unimaginable. But the plant hormone strigolactone could make it possible, plant biologists have shown. The hormone supports the symbiosis between fungi and plant roots, thus encouraging plants' growth -- even under the challenging conditions found in space.
8h ago sciencedaily.com
Societies can remain distinct despite migration
Countries around the world can retain distinct cultures despite migration, new research shows.
8h ago sciencedaily.com
Novel switching valve to receive more semen in a sex-role reversed cave insect
The female of a sex-role reversed cave insect species Neotrogla has evolved a switching valve to receive more semen during mating, when a penis-like structure in the female anchors in the male 'vagina.'
9h ago sciencedaily.com
Electrical enhancement: Engineers speed up electrons in semiconductors
Researchers have sped up the movement of electrons in organic semiconductor films by two to three orders of magnitude. The speedier electronics could lead to improved solar power and transistor use across the world, according to the scientists.
9h ago sciencedaily.com
Why Cross-Training Is Essential (and Improves Your DNA)
Including cross-training in your fitness program allows you to vary the stress placed on specific muscles and your cardiovascular system -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h ago scientificamerican.com
Russian hackers are accused of infecting three Eastern European companies with malware
9h ago technologyreview.com
Simulating nuclear safety
Commercial operation of the CHASNUPP-1 996 megawatt intermediate type pressurised water reactor began in May 2000 in Pakistan. It is a conventional two-loop PWR and is run by the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission. Now, scientists Khurram Mehboob and Mohammad Aljohani of the Department of Nuclear Engineering at King Abdul Aziz University in Saudi Arabia have carried out simulations of the activity of the unit using MATLAB to probe the risks associated with a putative coolant leak that might see radioactivity entering the environment. The team reports details of their study in the International Journal of Nuclear Energy Science and Technology.
9h ago phys.org
New research identifies two types of drought across China and how they evolve
Flash drought is a rapidly intensifying water deficit process accompanied by high temperatures in a short period of time. Recently, heat extremes have become more frequent in a warming climate, and have substantially increased the occurrence of flash drought, which threatens crop yields and water supply.
10h ago phys.org
Climate changes require better adaptation to drought
Europe's future climate will be characterised by more frequent heat waves and more widespread drought. Heat and drought will both challenge crop production, but drought in particular will be a problem—especially for spring sown crops such as maize.
10h ago phys.org
Novel study shows promise for managing wild horse populations
For more than eight years, Colorado State University researchers have studied a vaccine called GonaCon as a safe and humane solution for the overpopulation of wild horses.
10h ago phys.org
Participating in sports during childhood may have long-term benefits for bone health
Participation in organized sport during childhood and adolescence is associated with bone mass at 20 years of age.
10h ago sciencedaily.com
Winter ticks killing moose at alarming rate
Researchers have found that the swell of infestations of winter ticks -- which attach themselves to moose during the fall and feed throughout the winter -- is the primary cause of an unprecedented 70 percent death rate of calves over a three-year period.
10h ago sciencedaily.com
Supermassive black holes and supercomputers
The universe's deep past is beyond the reach of even the mighty Hubble Space Telescope. But a new review explains how creation of the first stars and galaxies is nevertheless being mapped in detail, with the aid of computer simulations and theoretical models -- and how a new generation of supercomputers and software is being built that will fill in the gaps.
10h ago sciencedaily.com
Controlling organic semiconductor band gaps by electron-acceptor fluorination
Researchers synthesized a fluorinated electron-acceptor for use in organic semiconductors. The high electronegativity of the fluorine substituents enhanced the electron-accepting properties of the widely used electron-acceptor. The power conversion efficiency of a thin film solar cell based on the fluorinated product was shown to be significantly higher than that of a cell containing an unmodified analogue. The synthesized material could be applied in thin film organic solar cell devices.
10h ago sciencedaily.com
Nutrition has a greater impact on bone strength than exercise
One question that scientists and fitness experts alike would love to answer is whether exercise or nutrition has a bigger positive impact on bone strength.
10h ago sciencedaily.com
Penetrating the soil's surface with radar
Ground penetrating radar measures the amount of moisture in soil quickly and easily. Researchers' calculations from the data informs agricultural water use and climate models.
10h ago sciencedaily.com
Paternal transmission of epigenetic memory via sperm
Studies of human populations and animal models suggest that a father's experiences such as diet or environmental stress can influence the health and development of his descendants. How these effects are transmitted across generations, however, remains mysterious. A new study in the roundworm C. elegans documents the transmission via sperm of epigenetic marks that are both necessary and sufficient to guide proper development of germ cells in the offspring.
10h ago sciencedaily.com
Tornadoes are spinning up farther east in US, study finds
Over the past few decades tornadoes have been shifting—decreasing in Oklahoma, Texas and Kansas but spinning up more in states along the Mississippi River and farther east, a new study shows. Scientists aren't quite certain why.
12h ago phys.org
Tesla secures land for Shanghai factory, first outside US
Electric auto brand Tesla Inc. says it has secured land in Shanghai for its first factory outside the United States, pushing ahead despite mounting U.S.-Chinese trade tensions.
12h ago phys.org
Facebook makes reality TV its new weapon for web supremacy
Facebook said Wednesday it was reviving the pioneering MTV reality show "The Real World" as its secret weapon to lure viewers away from YouTube.
12h ago phys.org
New emission tests brake EU car sales in September
Car sales slumped across Europe in September, industry data published Wednesday showed, with the hangover from a sales binge before new emissions tests came into force knocking Volkswagen out of its traditional top spot in monthly sales.
12h ago phys.org
Unlocking the "Mystery" of Consciousness
Explaining it requires neither supernatural intervention nor any new fundamental physics -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h ago blogs.scientificamerican.com