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Florida city pays $600,000 ransom to save computer records
A Florida city agreed to pay $600,000 in ransom to hackers who took over its computer system, the latest in thousands of attacks worldwide aimed at extorting money from governments and businesses.
6/19/2019 phys.org
Mineral discovery made easier: X-ray technique shines a new light on tiny, rare crystals
Like a tiny needle in a sprawling hayfield, a single crystal grain measuring just tens of millionths of a meter—found in a borehole sample drilled in Central Siberia—had an unexpected chemical makeup.
6/19/2019 phys.org
The intersection of vision and language
Nine thousand two hundred artificial intelligence researchers. Five thousand one hundred sixty-five research papers submitted, of which only 1,300 were accepted. One Best Student Paper.
6/19/2019 phys.org
Oceanographers investigate the ocean's carbon-absorbing processes over time
It's a well-known fact that the ocean is one of the biggest absorbers of the carbon dioxide emitted by way of human activity. What's less well known is how the ocean's processes for absorbing that carbon change over time, and how they might affect its ability to buffer climate change.
6/19/2019 phys.org
Stabilizing nations' food production through crop diversity
With increasing demand for food from the planet's growing population and climate change threatening the stability of food systems across the world, University of Minnesota research examined how the diversity of crops at the national level could increase the harvest stability of all crops in a nation.
6/19/2019 phys.org
New platform flips traditional on-demand supply chain approach on its head
Imagine you are heading to the grocery store and receive a phone alert asking if you'd also be willing to bring your neighbor's groceries home. Or you are on your way to a concert and see you could fill the seats of your car—and your wallet—if you picked up a few other music fans along the way. As the supplier in these scenarios, you have the choice of which services you provide and when. This may very well be the way commerce is headed.
6/19/2019 phys.org
Physicists show novel Mott state in twisted graphene bilayers at 'magic angle'
A University of Oklahoma physics group sheds light on a novel Mott state observed in twisted graphene bilayers at the 'magic angle' in a recent study just published in Physical Review Letters. OU physicists show the Mott state in graphene bilayers favors ferromagnetic alignment of the electron spins, a phenomenon unheard of in conventional Mott insulators, and a new concept on the novel insulating state observed in twisted graphene bilayers.
6/19/2019 phys.org
Neutrons get a wider angle on DNA and RNA to advance 3-D models
Scientists from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland are using neutrons at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to capture new information about DNA and RNA molecules and enable more accurate computer simulations of how they interact with everything from proteins to viruses. Resolving the 3-D structures of the body's fundamental genetic materials in solution will play a vital role in drug discovery and development for critical medical treatments.
3m ago phys.org
The dynamics of workplace sexual harassment in the US
A new Gender, Work & Organization analysis of U.S. data from 1997-2016 provides new insights into workplace sexual harassment.
19m ago phys.org
Scientists chart course toward a new world of synthetic biology
Genetically engineered trees that provide fire-resistant lumber for homes. Modified organs that won't be rejected. Synthetic microbes that monitor your gut to detect invading disease organisms and kill them before you get sick.
19m ago phys.org
Scientists record singing by rare right whale for first time
Federal marine biologists have recorded singing by one of the rarest whales on the planet.
23m ago phys.org
Survey sees biggest US honeybee winter die-off yet
Winter hit U.S. honeybees hard with the highest loss rate yet, an annual survey of beekeepers showed.
24m ago phys.org
High reaction rates even without precious metals
Non-precious metal nanoparticles could one day replace expensive catalysts for hydrogen production. However, it is often difficult to determine what reaction rates they can achieve, especially when it comes to oxide particles. This is because the particles must be attached to the electrode using a binder and conductive additives, which distort the results. With the aid of electrochemical analyses of individual particles, researchers have now succeeded in determining the activity and substance conversion of nanocatalysts made from cobalt iron oxide -- without any binders.
1h ago sciencedaily.com
Study predicts more long-term sea level rise from Greenland ice
Greenland's melting ice sheet could generate more sea level rise than previously thought if greenhouse gas emissions continue to increase and warm the atmosphere at their current rate, according to a new modeling study. The study, which used data from NASA's Operation IceBridge airborne campaign, was published in Science Advances today. In the next 200 years, the ice sheet model shows that melting at the present rate could contribute 19 to 63 inches to global sea level rise, said the team led by scientists at the Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. These numbers are at least 80 percent higher than previous estimates, which forecasted up to 35 inches of sea level rise from Greenland's ice.
1h ago phys.org
Melting of Himalayan glaciers has doubled in recent years
A newly comprehensive study shows that melting of Himalayan glaciers caused by rising temperatures has accelerated dramatically since the start of the 21st century. The analysis, spanning 40 years of satellite observations across India, China, Nepal and Bhutan, indicates that glaciers have been losing the equivalent of more than a vertical foot and half of ice each year since 2000—double the amount of melting that took place from 1975 to 2000. The study is the latest and perhaps most convincing indication that climate change is eating the Himalayas' glaciers, potentially threatening water supplies for hundreds of millions of people downstream across much of Asia.
1h ago phys.org
Frog protein may mitigate dangers posed by toxic marine microbes
A new study from UC San Francisco suggests that a protein found in the common bullfrog may one day be used to detect and neutralize a poisonous compound produced by red tides and other harmful algal blooms. The discovery comes as these waterborne toxic events are becoming increasingly common, a consequence of climate change making the world's oceans more hospitable to the microbes responsible for these formerly infrequent flare-ups.
1h ago phys.org
Ediacaran dinner party featured plenty to eat, adequate sanitation, computer model shows
Earth's first dinner party wasn't impressive, just a bunch of soft-bodied Ediacaran organisms sunk into sediment on the ocean floor, sharing in scraps of organic matter suspended in the water around them.
1h ago phys.org
Groundwater pumping has significantly reduced US stream flows
Groundwater pumping in the last century has contributed as much as 50 percent to stream flow declines in some U.S. rivers, according to new research led by a University of Arizona hydrologist.
1h ago phys.org
Human migration in Oceania recreated through paper mulberry genetics
The migration and interaction routes of prehistoric humans throughout the islands of Oceania can be retraced using genetic differences between paper mulberry plants, a tree native to Asia cultivated for fibers to make paper and introduced into the Pacific in prehistoric times to make barkcloth. Daniela Seelenfreund of the University of Chile and Andrea Seelenfreund of the Academia de Humanismo Cristiano University, Chile report on prehistoric human movements based on the genetic analysis of this plant in a new paper published June 19 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.
1h ago phys.org
Marriage may not aid financial savings for those who favor immediate rewards
A study of married couples in Vietnam suggests that, when one spouse tends to favor immediate rewards, marriage does not help them commit to saving money. Hisaki Kono of Kyoto University, Japan, and Tomomi Tanaka of the World Bank, US, present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.
1h ago phys.org
Early Celts in Burgundy appropriated Mediterranean products and feasting practices
Early Celts in eastern France imported Mediterranean pottery, as well as olive oil and wine, and may have appropriated Mediterranean feasting practices, according to a study published June 19, 2019 in PLOS ONE, by Maxime Rageot from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München and the University of Tübingen, and colleagues.
1h ago phys.org
Investigating coral and algal 'matchmaking' at the cellular level
What factors govern algae's success as "tenants" of their coral hosts both under optimal conditions and when oceanic temperatures rise? A Victoria University of Wellington-led team of experts that includes Carnegie's Arthur Grossman investigates this question.
2h ago phys.org
Finding 'Nemo's' family tree of anemones
Thanks in part to the popular film Finding Nemo, clownfishes are well known to the public and well represented in scientific literature. But the same can't be said for the equally colorful sea anemones—venomous, tentacled animals—that protect clownfishes and that the fish nourish and protect in return. A new study published online this month in the journal Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution takes a step to change that, presenting a new tree of life for clownfish-hosting sea anemones along with some surprises about their taxonomy and origins.
2h ago phys.org
How much work brings happiness? Not much, study shows
Having a job can be a boon to mental well-being, but for many of us, it only takes one day of work per week, a new study suggests.
2h ago phys.org
Plate tectonics may have driven 'Cambrian Explosion'
The quest to discover what drove one of the most important evolutionary events in the history of life on Earth has taken a new, fascinating twist.
2h ago sciencedaily.com
Extreme pressure and heat in Earth's mantle simulated
Unlike flawless gems, fibrous diamonds often contain small saline inclusions. These give hints to scientists about the conditions under which diamonds are formed deep in the Earth's mantle. A research team has now solved the puzzle of the formation of these inclusions by simulating conditions of extreme heat and pressure in the laboratory.
2h ago sciencedaily.com
Wind can prevent seabirds accessing their most important habitat
We marvel at flying animals because it seems like they can access anywhere, but a first study of its kind has revealed that wind can prevent seabirds from accessing the most important of habitats: their nests.
2h ago sciencedaily.com
Researchers see around corners to detect object shapes
Computer vision researchers have demonstrated they can use special light sources and sensors to see around corners or through gauzy filters, enabling them to reconstruct the shapes of unseen objects. The researchers said this technique enables them to reconstruct images in great detail, including the relief of George Washington's profile on a US quarter.
2h ago sciencedaily.com
First step towards a better prosthetic leg? Trip people over and over
The first step a team took in addressing a challenge in lower-body prosthetics was coming to understand the way people with two legs catch themselves, accomplished by covering test subjects with motion-capturing sensors.
2h ago sciencedaily.com
Investigating coral and algal 'matchmaking' at the cellular level
What factors govern algae's success as 'tenants' of their coral hosts both under optimal conditions and when oceanic temperatures rise?
2h ago sciencedaily.com
Delayed Kentucky internet project faces new squirrel setback
A project that would bring high-speed internet across Kentucky will be delayed because company representatives say an "abundance" of squirrels have chewed through wiring.
2h ago phys.org
Melting in the Himalayas is accelerating—and yes, it’s climate change
2h ago technologyreview.com
Perfect quantum portal emerges at exotic interface
Researchers at the University of Maryland have captured the most direct evidence to date of a quantum quirk that allows particles to tunnel through a barrier like it's not even there. The result, featured on the cover of the June 20, 2019 issue of the journal Nature, may enable engineers to design more uniform components for future quantum computers, quantum sensors and other devices.
2h ago phys.org
Successful 'alien' bird invasions are location dependent
Published today in Nature, researchers show that alien bird introductions are most successful in locations and climates similar to their native habitats and in places where other alien species are already established.
2h ago phys.org
Special nanotubes could improve solar power and imaging technology
Physicists have discovered a novel kind of nanotube that generates current in the presence of light. Devices such as optical sensors and infrared imaging chips are likely applications, which could be useful in fields such as automated transport and astronomy. In future, if the effect can be magnified and the technology scaled up, it could lead to high-efficiency solar power devices.
2h ago phys.org
Researchers reproduce micro-scale 'Great Wave' painting with inkless technology
Katsushika Hokusai (1760 - 1849) is the titan of Japanese art, as revered in his homeland as are Da Vinci, Van Gogh and Rembrandt Van Rijn in the West. Of all his famed masterpieces, the "Great Wave" stands out as the ultimate testament to his artistic genius.
2h ago phys.org
Size is not everything according to latest Nature Index annual tables
In the Nature Index 2019 annual tables, released today, the United States is well ahead of China then Germany to make up the top three in the country ranking, while the top three institutions—the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Harvard University and Max Planck Society—have held fast to their positions in the institutional ranks. For the first time, the Nature Index annual tables also include a normalized ranking. This takes into account the number of high-quality articles published as a proportion of an institute's overall output in the natural sciences. The normalized ranking reveals a very different set of leaders among academic institutions.
2h ago phys.org
Trump moves to weaken Obama climate policy, bolster coal industry
The Trump administration on Wednesday unveiled its final plan to rewrite a major Obama-era climate change policy, replacing proposed regulations that cracked down on coal-burning power plants with a weaker alternative.
2h ago phys.org
Making systems robust
The human body keeps the calcium concentration in the blood constant, similarly to an aircraft's autopilot keeping the plane at a constant altitude. What they have in common is that both the body and the autopilot employ sophisticated integral feedback control mechanisms.
2h ago phys.org
Flood Insurance Program Increasingly Underwater as Payouts Shatter Records
Louisiana and Texas accounted for half the money paid out by the National Flood Insurance Program since 1973 -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h ago scientificamerican.com
Solving Our Plastic Problem
At Scientific American's third Science on the Hill event, experts from academia and the private sector met at the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill to talk with Scientific American... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h ago flex.acast.com
Powering a solution: Professor takes charge at improving lithium ion batteries safety
As cutting edge as electric vehicles are, they're still vulnerable to an Achilles heel—the very source that gives them power.
2h ago phys.org
What's the future for cash? Target register outages prove physical loot still has its place
Does the use of cash have an expiration date?
2h ago phys.org
Phage display for engineering blood-contacting surfaces
Surfaces that enable endothelial cell attachment without causing blood clotting are needed for various tissue engineering efforts. A new approach involving phage display has been used to identify unique peptides with these typically divergent characteristics. The work is published in Tissue Engineering.
2h ago phys.org
Whites' racial prejudice can lessen over time, research shows
Prejudice among white people can lessen over time, according to new research from Rice University.
2h ago phys.org
Aggressive, non-native wetland plants squelch species richness more than dominant natives do
Dominant, non-native plants reduce wetland biodiversity and abundance more than native plants do, researchers report in the journal Ecology Letters. Even native plants that dominate wetland landscapes play better with others, the team found.
2h ago phys.org
Fifty years after the Cuyahoga conflagration
On June 22, 1969, the Cuyahoga River, which flows through Cleveland, Ohio, caught fire. Although firefighters extinguished the blaze within 30 minutes, the shocking event helped galvanize the U.S. environmental movement. Fifty years later, the river is much healthier but still recuperating from a legacy of pollution, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.
3h ago phys.org
A forest of nano-mushroom structures keep this plastic clean and stain-free
Technologies like solar panels and LEDs require a cover material that repels water, dirt and oil while still letting plenty of light through. There is also interest in new flexible materials so these devices can be incorporated into a variety of creative applications like curtains, clothes, and paper. Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering have created a flexible optical plastic that has all of those properties, finding inspiration in a surprising place: the shape of Enoki mushrooms.
3h ago phys.org
US military consumes more hydrocarbons than most countries—massive hidden impact on climate
The US military's carbon footprint is enormous and must be confronted in order to have a substantial effect on battling global warming.
3h ago phys.org
Plate tectonics may have driven Cambrian Explosion, study shows
The quest to discover what drove one of the most important evolutionary events in the history of life on Earth has taken a new, fascinating twist.
3h ago phys.org
South African forests show pathways to a sustainable future
Native forests make up 1percent of the landscape in South Africa but could play a key role in reducing atmospheric carbon and identifying sustainable development practices that can be used globally to counter climate change, according to a Penn State researcher.
3h ago phys.org
Nature-inspired materials can be used in applications ranging from tunneling to space
Optimal materials for cutting tools of tunnel boring machines (TBM) were developed in the recently finished three-year long project "Innovative polycrystalline diamond (PDC) drag bit for soft ground tunnel boring machines" by TalTech materials scientists from the tribology and recycling group.
3h ago phys.org
Biochar may boost carbon storage, but benefits to germination and growth appear scant
Biochar may not be the miracle soil additive that many farmers and researchers hoped it to be, according to a new University of Illinois study. Biochar may boost the agricultural yield of some soils—especially poor quality ones—but there is no consensus on its effectiveness. Researchers tested different soils' responses to multiple biochar types and were unable to verify their ability to increase plant growth. However, the study did show biochar's ability to affect soil greenhouse gas emissions.
3h ago phys.org
Freezing bubbles viral video inspired research now published
Scientific inquiry often begins with the "why."
3h ago phys.org
Artificial muscles powered by glucose
Artificial muscles made from polymers can now be powered by energy from glucose and oxygen, just like biological muscles. This advance may be a step on the way to implantable artificial muscles or autonomous microrobots powered by biomolecules in their surroundings. Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, have presented their results in the journal Advanced Materials.
3h ago phys.org
Pilots criticize Boeing for mistakes on its grounded jet
Retired pilot Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger told a congressional panel Wednesday that pilots should practice the failure of Boeing flight-control software on simulators, not planes full of passengers.
3h ago phys.org
Watchdog criticizes rising costs, delays of NASA's next Moon rocket
The giant rocket NASA plans to use to return to the Moon by 2024 has been beset by delays and spending has overrun by almost 30 percent, an official audit said Wednesday.
3h ago phys.org
Expanding the temperature range of lithium-ion batteries
Electric cars struggle with extreme temperatures, mainly because of impacts on the electrolyte solutions in their lithium-ion batteries. Now, researchers have developed new electrolytes containing multiple additives that work better over a wide temperature range. They report their results in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.
3h ago phys.org
Unearthing the sweet potato proteome
The sweet, starchy orange sweet potatoes are tasty and nutritious ingredients for fries, casseroles and pies. Although humans have been cultivating sweet potatoes for thousands of years, scientists still don't know much about the protein makeup of these tubers. In ACS' Journal of Proteome Research, researchers have analyzed the proteome of sweet potato leaves and roots, and in the process, have revealed new insights into the plant's genome.
3h ago phys.org
Why tiny microbes may be a big factor in how climate change unfolds
Climate change is about big things: melting ice sheets, rising seas, the feverish temperature of the planet.
3h ago phys.org
Joint hypermobility related to anxiety, also in animals
The relation between collagen laxity and anxiety in humans is widely known, but this relation has never been observed before in other species. A team of researchers led by professors Jaume Fatjó and Antoni Bulbena from the Department of Psychiatry and Legal Medicine at the UAB, the Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute (IMIM) and the UAB Affinity Foundation Chair in Animals and Health, analysed a set of 13 animal behaviour characteristics and hip joint mobility in a total of 5,575 domestic dogs. The results point to an association between hip joint hypermobility and a brain activation linked to emotions in dogs, with similar results as to those observed in people.
3h ago phys.org
High temperature records will be 'smashed' in coming century
Climate change will cause some regions of the world to "smash" high temperature records every year in the coming century, researchers warn. That will push "ecosystems and communities beyond their ability to cope," according to the authors of the study published online June 17 in Nature Climate Change.
3h ago phys.org
Got noxious weeds? In Seattle metro, there's an app for that
The small, white flower clusters can reach up to 10 feet and, to the unaware landscaper, would look pretty in a garden. Its leaves are bright green and the root looks like a carrot or parsnip. But the plant is also an invader that can wreak havoc if it's not contained.
3h ago phys.org
This software titan proposes a computer museum to mark Philly's role in starting the digital world
Computers didn't start in Silicon Valley. They started here," in Philadelphia, says Jim Scherrer.
3h ago phys.org
How humans and robots work side-by-side in Amazon fulfillment centers
Amazon employees start their shifts passing through turnstiles and a sign reminding them what they can't bring with them as they report for work alongside robots.
3h ago phys.org
There's a giant dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico thanks in large part to pollution from Chicago
Just off the coast of Louisiana, where the Mississippi River lets out into the Gulf of Mexico, an enormous algae bloom, fueled by fertilizer from Midwestern farm fields and urban sewage, creates an area so devoid of oxygen it's uninhabitable to most marine life every summer.
3h ago phys.org
Research shows wind can prevent seabirds accessing their most important habitat
We marvel at flying animals because it seems like they can access anywhere, but a first study of its kind has revealed that wind can prevent seabirds from accessing the most important of habitats: their nests.
3h ago phys.org
Owner training key to reducing risk of dog bite injuries
Dog attacks have been on the rise and it may the owners who need to go back to school. A new study published in Risk Analysis: An International Journal investigated what leads dog owners to train their pets using positive reinforcement methods.
3h ago phys.org
Upcycling process brings new life to old jeans
A growing population, rising standards of living and quickly changing fashions send mountains of clothing waste to the world's landfills each year. Although processes for textile recycling exist, they tend to be inefficient and expensive. Now, researchers have reported in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering an efficient, low-cost method that can convert waste denim into viscose-type fibers that are either white or the original color of the garment.
3h ago phys.org
The secret of platinum deposits revealed by field observations in South Africa
There are two competing ideas of how platinum deposits formed: the first involves gravity-induced settling of crystals on the chamber floor, while the second idea implies that the crystals grow in situ, directly on the floor of the magmatic chamber. Researchers have established that the crystals grow in situ, with its high platinum status being attained while all its minerals were crystallizing along the cooling margins of the magma chamber.
4h ago sciencedaily.com
Inattentive children earn less money at 35
An international team finds that if kids can't pay attention in kindergarten, they will grow up to have less lucrative careers.
4h ago sciencedaily.com
Joint hypermobility related to anxiety, also in animals
Researchers report the first evidence in a non-human species, the domestic dog, of a relation between joint hypermobility and excitability: dogs with more joint mobility and flexibility tend to have more anxiety problems.
4h ago sciencedaily.com
'Goldilocks' neurons promote REM sleep
It has been a mystery why REM sleep, or dream sleep, increases when the room temperature is 'just right'. Neuroscientists show that melanin-concentrating hormone neurons within the hypothalamus increase REM sleep when the need for body temperature defense is minimized, such as when sleeping in a warm and comfortable room temperature. These data have important implications for the function of REM sleep.
4h ago sciencedaily.com
Fatty fish without environmental pollutants protect against type 2 diabetes
If the fatty fish we eat were free of environmental pollutants, it would reduce our risk of developing type 2 diabetes. However, the pollutants in the fish have the opposite effect and appears to eliminate the protective effect from fatty fish intake. This has been shown by researchers using innovative methods that could be used to address several questions about food and health in future studies.
4h ago sciencedaily.com
Contemplating the Lives behind Ancient Bones
The remains of our distant relatives evoke more than just data points -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h ago blogs.scientificamerican.com
Mapping and measuring proteins on the surfaces of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in cells
Sigma receptors are proteins found mainly on the surface of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in certain cells. Sigma-1 and sigma-2 are the two main classes of these receptors. The sigma-1 receptor is involved in neurological disorders and certain types of cancer. To understand better how the receptor is involved in disease and whether drugs developed to target it are working, it is important to be able to accurately trace the sigma-1 receptor. Researchers at Kanazawa University have developed a probe, which can identify and latch onto the sigma-1 receptor.
4h ago phys.org
UK makes 'first' conviction over 3-D printed gun
A student was convicted on Wednesday of manufacturing a firearm using a 3-D printer, in what London's police said they believed was the first such successful prosecution in Britain.
4h ago phys.org
Researchers enhance security in proof of stake blockchain protocols
Blockchain Technology is known to be one of the top disruptive technologies of today that is driving the fourth industrial revolution. A blockchain, designed to be resistant to the modification of its data, offers security and privacy benefits that are well appreciated particularly by banks, governments and techno-corporations.
4h ago phys.org
Is glue the answer to climate change?
A small amount of cheap epoxy resin replaces bulky support materials in making effective carbon capture solid sorbents, developed by scientists.
4h ago sciencedaily.com
Motherhood can deliver body image boost
New research indicates that perfectionism is related to breast size dissatisfaction, but only in non-mothers -- suggesting that mothers are more comfortable with their bodies.
4h ago sciencedaily.com
Game of drones: Airports rally firms to battle threat from above
A quadcopter drone appears on the radar screen and makes a beeline for the control tower at Paris' Le Bourget airport.
4h ago phys.org
A sound idea: A step towards quantum computing
A team at the University of Tsukuba studied a novel process for creating coherent lattice waves inside silicon crystals using ultrashort laser pulses. Using theoretical calculations combined with experimental results that were obtained at the University of Pittsburgh, they were able to show that coherent vibrational signals could be maintained inside the samples. This research may lead to quantum computers based on existing silicon devices that can rapidly perform tasks out of the reach of even the fastest supercomputers now available.
4h ago phys.org
Pitt researchers' report pushes for regional green infrastructure database
Stakeholders invested in the region's waterways, stormwater management and green infrastructure have a new roadmap to help understand the most important challenges they're facing and how to outline the most effective solutions.
4h ago phys.org
Astronomers make first detection of polarised radio waves in Gamma Ray Burst jets
Good fortune and cutting-edge scientific equipment have allowed scientists to observe a Gamma Ray Burst jet with a radio telescope and detect the polarisation of radio waves within it for the first time—moving us closer to an understanding of what causes the universe's most powerful explosions.
4h ago phys.org
Antarctic marine life recovery following the dinosaurs' extinction
A new study shows how marine life around Antarctica returned after the extinction event that wiped out the dinosaurs. A team studied just under 3000 marine fossils collected from Antarctica to understand how life on the sea floor recovered after the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) mass extinction 66 million years ago. They reveal it took one million years for the marine ecosystem to return to pre-extinction levels.
4h ago sciencedaily.com
Curbing the flammability of epoxy resin
In a paper to be published in a forthcoming issue of Nano, a team of researchers from Henan University have investigated the flame retardant performance of epoxy resin using a boron nitride nanosheet decorated with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.
4h ago phys.org
Secure quantum communications in the microwave range for the first time
Mikel Sanz, of the Physical Chemistry Department of UPV/EHU, leads the theoretical group for an experiment published by the prestigious journal, Nature Communications. The experiment has managed to prepare a remote quantum state; i.e., absolutely secure communication was established with another, physically separated quantum computer for the first time in the microwave regime. This new technology may bring about a revolution in the next few years.
4h ago phys.org
Efficiently producing fatty acids and biofuels from glucose
Researchers have presented a new strategy for efficiently producing fatty acids and biofuels that can transform glucose and oleaginous microorganisms into microbial diesel fuel, with one-step direct fermentative production.
4h ago phys.org
Astronomers make first detection of polarized radio waves in Gamma Ray Burst jets
Astronomers detect polarized radio waves from a gamma-ray burst for the first time. Polarization signature reveals magnetic fields in explosions to be much more patchy and tangled than first thought. Combining the observations with data from X-ray and visible light telescopes is helping unravel the mysteries of the universe's most powerful explosions.
5h ago sciencedaily.com
High postural sway doubles older women's fracture risk
Postural sway is an independent risk factor for bone fractures in postmenopausal women, according to a new study. Women with the highest postural sway had a two times higher fracture risk compared to women with the lowest postural sway.
5h ago sciencedaily.com
Electrons take alternative route to prevent plant stress
When plants absorb excess light energy during photosynthesis, reactive oxygen species are produced, potentially causing oxidative stress that damages important structures. Plants can suppress the production of reactive oxygen species by oxidizing P700 (the reaction center chlorophyll in photosystem I). A new study has revealed more about this vital process.
5h ago sciencedaily.com
Memories form 'barrier' to letting go of objects for people who hoard
Researchers hope that the findings could help develop new ways to train people with hoarding difficulties to discard clutter.
5h ago sciencedaily.com
Researchers find quantum gravity has no symmetry
Using holography, researchers have found when gravity is combined with quantum mechanics, symmetry is not possible.
5h ago sciencedaily.com
Mapping and measuring proteins on the surfaces of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in cells
Sigma receptors are proteins found on mainly the surface of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in certain cells. Sigma-1 and sigma-2 are the two main classes of these receptors. The sigma-1 receptor is involved neurological disorders and certain types of cancer. To understand better how the receptor is involved in disease and whether drugs developed to target it are working, it is important to be able to accurately trace the sigma-1 receptor. Researchers have now developed a probe, which can identify and latch onto the sigma-1 receptor.
5h ago sciencedaily.com
Measuring peace essential to effective peacebuilding
Lack of effective means of measuring the quality of the peace may contribute to recurrence of violence in war-torn areas, according to a new book by Oxford professor Richard Caplan.
5h ago phys.org
Tasty deals: Apps help find unsold food and reduce waste
After a long day at work, Annekathrin Fiesinger is too tired to consider making dinner at home. So the 34-year-old uses her smart phone to check nearby restaurants, hotels or bakeries in Berlin for food being sold for a discount at the end of the day.
5h ago phys.org
Researchers lay out plan for managing rivers for climate change
New strategies for river management are needed to maintain water supplies and avoid big crashes in populations of aquatic life, researchers argue in a perspective piece published today in Nature.
5h ago phys.org
Real-time analysis of MOF adsorption behavior
Researchers have developed a technology to analyze the adsorption behavior of molecules in each individual pore of a metal organic framework (MOF). This system has large specific surface areas, allowing for the real-time observation of the adsorption process of an MOF, a new material effective for sorting carbon dioxide, hydrogen, and methane.
5h ago phys.org
Good viruses and bad bacteria: A world-first green sea turtle trial
Researchers at the JCU Turtle Health Research Facility have conducted a first-of-its-kind study using what's known as phage therapy as an option for bacterial infections in green sea turtles.
5h ago phys.org
Understanding nuclear weapons and Iran's uranium enrichment program
Iranian leaders have threatened to withdraw from a 2015 agreement that limits their nation's nuclear activities. Under the deal, the United States and five other world powers lifted economic sanctions they had imposed to prevent Iran from developing nuclear weapons. But President Trump removed the U.S. from the deal in 2018 and reimposed sanctions.
5h ago phys.org
Using culture to breathe new life into historic city centres
Urban decay, social conflict and low living standards are not uncommon in many of Europe's historic city centres. Is it possible to breathe new life into these areas while doing it in a sustainable way?
5h ago phys.org
Image: Metal bracket in Ariane 5 is 3-D-printed in titanium
This organically-styled bracket, designed for the interior of an Ariane 5 launcher, was 3-D printed in space-worthy titanium alloy for an R&D project.
5h ago phys.org
Cat muzzles: cruel or useful?
It's not unusual to slap a muzzle on a dog if it's being aggressive or not keen on being given an injection, but a muzzle is not part of your average cat's wardrobe. Yet there they are online, by the dozen, in a wide range of styles and colours.
5h ago phys.org
Directed evolution comes to plants
A new platform for speeding up and controlling the evolution of proteins inside living plants has been developed by a KAUST-led team.
5h ago phys.org
Learning constrains further learning, neuroscientists find
Why is it that a master musician can learn a new score in no time, yet encounter difficulty learning something else, like skateboarding tricks? Could there is any truth to the myth that you use only 10 percent of your brain? A recent neuroscience study at KTH Royal Institute of Technology offers some answers about the limits of new learning and how the brain adapts to developing new skills and knowledge.
5h ago phys.org
High reaction rates even without precious metals
Non-precious metal nanoparticles could one day replace expensive catalysts for hydrogen production. However, it is often difficult to determine what reaction rates they can achieve, especially when it comes to oxide particles. This is because the particles must be attached to the electrode using a binder and conductive additives, which distort the results. With the aid of electrochemical analyses of individual particles, researchers have now succeeded in determining the activity and substance conversion of nanocatalysts made from cobalt iron oxide—without any binders. The team led by Professor Kristina Tschulik from Ruhr-Universität Bochum reports together with colleagues from the University of Duisburg-Essen and from Dresden in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, published online on 30 May 2019.
5h ago phys.org
How bacteria protect themselves from plasma treatment
Plasmas are created from gas that is pumped with energy. Today, plasmas are already used against multi-resistant pathogens in clinical applications, for example to treat chronic wounds. "Plasmas provide a complex cocktail of components, many of which act as disinfectants in their own right," explains Professor Julia Bandow, head of the RUB research group Applied Microbiology. UV radiation, electric fields, atomic oxygen, superoxide, nitric oxides, ozone, and excited oxygen or nitrogen affect the pathogens simultaneously, generating considerable stress. Typically, the pathogens survive merely several seconds or minutes.
5h ago phys.org
Opinion: With cryptocurrency launch, Facebook sets its path toward becoming an independent nation
Facebook has announced a plan to launch a new cryptocurrency named the Libra, adding another layer to its efforts to dominate global communications and business. Backed by huge finance and technology companies including Visa, Spotify, eBay, PayPal and Uber—plus a ready-made user base of 2 billion people around the world—Facebook is positioned to pressure countries and central banks to cooperate with its reinvention of the global financial system.
5h ago phys.org
The secret of platinum deposits revealed by novel field observations in the Bushveld Complex
Research from the Wits School of Geoscience shows how platinum deposits form in the Bushveld Complex of South Africa.
5h ago phys.org
Get your fax right: Bungling officials spark Japan nuclear scare
Bungling Japanese officials sparked a nuclear scare after a violent, late-night earthquake by ticking the wrong box on a fax form—inadvertently alerting authorities to a potential accident.
5h ago phys.org
A sound idea: a step towards quantum computing
Researchers have developed a new method for using lasers to create tiny lattice waves inside silicon crystals that can encode quantum information. By taking advantage of existing silicon hardware, this work may greatly reduce the cost of future quantum computers for cryptographic and optimization applications.
5h ago sciencedaily.com
Developing a new type of refrigeration via force-driven liquid gas transition
A research team has made a groundbreaking discovery in the quest to replace hydrofluorocarbons in refrigeration systems with natural refrigerants such as water and alcohol. Their study involved carrying-out a liquid-to-gas phase transition via a nanosponge, a soft, elastic material equipped with small nanopores less than 10 nanometers. Their findings could lead to more efficient refrigerants with a smaller carbon footprint.
5h ago sciencedaily.com
Researchers find cause of rare, fatal disease that turns babies' lips and skin blue
Scientists used a gene editing method called CRISPR/Cas9 to generate mice that faithfully mimic a fatal respiratory disorder in newborn infants that turns their lips and skin blue. The new laboratory model allowed researchers to pinpoint the ailment's cause and develop a potential and desperately needed nanoparticle-based treatment. Mostly untreatable, Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia with Misalignment of Pulmonary Veins (ACDMPV) usually strikes infants within a month of birth.
5h ago sciencedaily.com
Real-time analysis of MOF adsorption behavior
Researchers have developed a technology to analyze the adsorption behavior of molecules in each individual pore of a metal organic framework (MOF). This system has large specific surface areas, allowing for the real-time observation of the adsorption process of an MOF, a new material effective for sorting carbon dioxide, hydrogen, and methane.
5h ago sciencedaily.com
How arousal impacts physiological synchrony in relationships
A team of researchers has examined what type of social interaction is required for people to display physiological synchrony -- mutual changes in autonomic nervous system activity. The study also looked at whether the levels of autonomic arousal people share predicts affiliation and friendship interest between people.
5h ago sciencedaily.com
Good viruses and bad bacteria: A world-first green sea turtle trial
A world-first study has found an alternative to antibiotics for treating bacterial infections in green sea turtles.
5h ago sciencedaily.com
Greenpeace sounds alarm over plastic pollution in rivers
Greenpeace on Wednesday raised the alarm over microplastics in rivers after finding the pollutant in all the rivers it tested in Britain, calling it a "problem of enormous complexity".
5h ago phys.org
US CEO hands Oxford University $189 million for AI studies
An American billionaire has given Oxford University 150 million pounds ($188.6 million) for a new institute that will study the ethical implications of artificial intelligence and computing technologies.
5h ago phys.org
Gun 'that ended Van Gogh's life' sells for nearly triple estimate
The revolver with which Vincent van Gogh is believed to have shot himself sold for 162,500 euros ($182,000) at a Paris auction on Wednesday—nearly three times the estimate.
5h ago phys.org
New study to examine feeding habits of Cape Cod great whites
Researchers on Cape Cod are launching a new study focused on the hunting and feeding habits of the region's great white sharks following last year's two attacks on humans, including the state's first fatal one in more than 80 years.
5h ago phys.org
Adidas loses EU court battle over 'three stripe' design
German sportswear giant Adidas on Wednesday lost a legal battle to trademark its "three stripe" motif in the EU, as a court ruled the design was not distinctive enough to deserve protection.
5h ago phys.org
Cyanide-free gold goes into production
Australia is leading the charge towards greener and safer gold production with an environmentally-superior alternative gold recovery process technology, dispensing with toxic cyanide and mercury currently used in most gold production processes worldwide.
5h ago phys.org
Colonial genocide is a composite act: A human rights analysis
Canada is currently embroiled in a debate about whether the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls should have used the word "genocide" to describe our federal, provincial and municipal governments' past and current treatment of Indigenous peoples. Perhaps this word is too strong and inaccurate.
5h ago phys.org
Is glue the answer to climate crisis?
Is glue the answer to climate change? Researchers at the Energy Safety Research Institute (ESRI) at Swansea University have proven that it could certainly help. They have developed a new material capable of capturing the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2) with the key ingredient being a common epoxy resin you probably have at home.
5h ago phys.org
Electrons take alternative route to prevent plant stress
Plants are susceptible to stress, and with the global impact of climate change and humanity's growing demand for food, it's crucial to understand what causes plant stress and stress tolerance. When plants absorb excess light energy during photosynthesis, reactive oxygen species are produced, potentially causing oxidative stress that damages important structures. Plants can suppress the production of reactive oxygen species by oxidizing P700 (the reaction center chlorophyll in photosystem I). A new study has revealed more about this vital process: the cyclic electron flow induced by P700 oxidation is an electric charge recombination occurring in photosystem I. These findings were published on June 5 in Plants.
5h ago phys.org
Meat is masculine: how food advertising perpetuates harmful gender stereotypes
The UK Advertising Standards Authority has introduced a new rule in its advertising code which bans adverts which feature gender stereotypes "that are likely to cause harm, or serious or widespread offence."
5h ago phys.org